Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-59b7f5684b-569ts Total loading time: 0.359 Render date: 2022-09-29T08:23:18.365Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "useRatesEcommerce": false, "displayNetworkTab": true, "displayNetworkMapGraph": false, "useSa": true } hasContentIssue true

13 - Social democracy and security

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  05 October 2013

Neil Walker
Affiliation:
University of Edinburgh
Michael Keating
Affiliation:
University of Aberdeen and University of Edinburgh
Get access

Summary

Introduction: the duality of social democracy

The main aim of this chapter is to account for and assess the dilemmas and difficulties a social democratic approach to crime and security faces in the context of the modern state. It examines the historical approach to these difficulties and identifies some of the new challenges to have emerged over the past thirty years or so. The chapter concludes by assessing the prospects of a new wave of social democratic policy on crime and security in the face of the combination of new and old challenges.

Historically the attitude of social democrats to crime and insecurity has displayed a tension that mirrors the deeper one within the social democratic project itself (Hattersley and Hickson 2011). Social democracy, put simply, has been historically located within the fluctuating terms of convergence and divergence between two narratives of modification of the classical socialist project – the modification of the classical means of socialist transformation and the modification of its classical ends. On the one hand, the social democratic narrative, while not ruling out a comprehensively egalitarian vision as an ultimate goal, has been concerned to map out an alternative parliamentary and constitutional pathway, one that rejects violent and extra-constitutional struggle and favours evolution over revolution. On the other hand, the social democratic narrative has also been about specifying and meeting realisable and self-standing objectives short of full social ownership.

Type
Chapter
Information
Publisher: Edinburgh University Press
Print publication year: 2013

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

Save book to Kindle

To save this book to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Available formats
×

Save book to Dropbox

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Available formats
×

Save book to Google Drive

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Available formats
×