Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-59b7f5684b-j4fss Total loading time: 0.505 Render date: 2022-10-05T00:22:12.427Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "useRatesEcommerce": false, "displayNetworkTab": true, "displayNetworkMapGraph": true, "useSa": true } hasContentIssue true

12 - From single market to social market economy: is there room for solidarity?

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  05 October 2013

Yves Mény
Affiliation:
European University Institute
Michael Keating
Affiliation:
University of Aberdeen and University of Edinburgh
Get access

Summary

Introduction

Each political season calls for new discourses and novel rhetoric. The Europe of Monnet was the Europe of peace and economic growth. The continued transformation of the European project over the past fifty years has required new narratives. The Lisbon Treaty rallied to the post-1945 German motto of committing Europe to ‘the social market economy’. It was a useful reminder of the ongoing challenge that advanced capitalist economies have had to face over the past 150 years: how to reconcile market iron rules with the imperatives of (social) democracy. Over the past century this historical compromise has taken on national traits and characteristics. Causes and objectives are similar across borders; agendas, timing and solutions are not, and have a distinctly national flavour. The issues that Europe is facing today are not so distinct from these past challenges; however, they are occurring in a very different context.

There is indeed a big difference: welfare state systems were constructed within distinct polities, run by national governments emanating most of the time from embryonic political parties. Governing elites were in control of economic, monetary, fiscal and budgetary policies. This is not true anymore within the European Union, in particular for those countries belonging to the eurozone. A radical division of powers between the supranational institutions and national governments deprives the former of most competences over welfare policies, while the latter has limited powers in the field of economic regulation (and, for the eurozone countries, no monetary powers).

Type
Chapter
Information
Publisher: Edinburgh University Press
Print publication year: 2013

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

Save book to Kindle

To save this book to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Available formats
×

Save book to Dropbox

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Available formats
×

Save book to Google Drive

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Available formats
×