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Published online by Cambridge University Press:  24 June 2019

Stefan Dollinger
Affiliation:
University of British Columbia, Vancouver
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Creating Canadian English
The Professor, the Mountaineer, and a National Variety of English
, pp. 259 - 273
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2019

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References

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  • Bibliography
  • Stefan Dollinger, University of British Columbia, Vancouver
  • Book: Creating Canadian English
  • Online publication: 24 June 2019
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/9781108596862.012
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  • Bibliography
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  • Bibliography
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  • Book: Creating Canadian English
  • Online publication: 24 June 2019
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/9781108596862.012
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