Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-684899dbb8-p6h7k Total loading time: 0.355 Render date: 2022-05-17T07:59:48.587Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "useRatesEcommerce": false, "useNewApi": true }

3 - International cooperation in Latin America: the design of regional institutions by slow accretion

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  22 September 2009

Jorge I. Domínguez
Affiliation:
Antonio Madero Professor of Government, Vice Provost for International Affairs Harvard University
Amitav Acharya
Affiliation:
University of Bristol
Alastair Iain Johnston
Affiliation:
Harvard University, Massachusetts
Get access

Summary

The first regional institutions in the Americas emerged in the 1820s as the successor states of Spain's American empire sought to construct stable, amicable, and productive relations between themselves. A relatively thick array of international institutional rules had emerged by the 1930s, well in advance of the foundation of the first formal international regional organizations in the hemisphere and three decades before the establishment of the first successful international subregional institutions. In the international relations of the Americas, the analysis of the emergence of institutional rules must to some extent be decoupled, therefore, from the analysis of organizations.

Yet not until the 1990s did international regional and subregional institutions in the Americas effectively promote trade, defend democracy, coordinate foreign policies, and contribute to an international milieu that reduced the frequency and intensity of militarized interstate disputes over territory and settled many of those disputes. International regional institutions in the Americas did not, therefore, have a crafting moment or a master architect. They resulted from the long accumulation of failures and occasional successes. The analytical task requires explaining the early establishment, long survival, delayed effectiveness, and eventual implementation of the rules of this array of international regional institutions – long periods of stasis followed by change.

In this essay, I argue, first, that the idea of international regionalism was a response to security problems in the immediate aftermath of Spanish American independence in the 1820s. This ideational legacy lingered well beyond the founding cause, however.

Type
Chapter
Information
Crafting Cooperation
Regional International Institutions in Comparative Perspective
, pp. 83 - 128
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2007

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)
4
Cited by

Save book to Kindle

To save this book to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Available formats
×

Save book to Dropbox

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Available formats
×

Save book to Google Drive

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Available formats
×