Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-684899dbb8-8hm5d Total loading time: 0.289 Render date: 2022-05-16T14:31:35.228Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "useRatesEcommerce": false, "useNewApi": true }

2 - Hanging together, institutional design, and cooperation in Southeast Asia: AFTA and the ARF

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  22 September 2009

Yuen Foong Khong
Affiliation:
Professor of International Relations and a Fellow of Nuffield College Oxford University
Helen E. S. Nesadurai
Affiliation:
Senior Lecturer in the School of Arts and Sciences Monash University Malaysia
Amitav Acharya
Affiliation:
University of Bristol
Alastair Iain Johnston
Affiliation:
Harvard University, Massachusetts
Get access

Summary

Introduction

One of the most fascinating developments in post-Cold War Asia-Pacific is the frenzy of (regional) institution-building that began in the late 1980s. At the intergovernmental level, we witness the founding of the following: Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC, 1989), the ASEAN Free Trade Area (AFTA, 1992), the ASEAN Regional Forum (ARF, 1994), and the ASEAN Plus Three forum (APT, 1997). Equally fascinating, the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) – a group of small to middle powers – played a lead role in the creation and maintenance of many of these institutions, in particular the ARF, AFTA, and the APT, while ASEAN's preference for informality and non-binding mechanisms prevailed over American and Australian preferences in the institutional design of APEC. Important too is the enlargement of ASEAN to ten members through the inclusion of Vietnam, Laos, Myanmar, and Cambodia in the 1990s. The reason for ASEAN's leading role in regional institution-building is partly historical, since ASEAN, formed in 1967, was until the 1990s the only regional institution of note in Asia. Hence it seemed natural to build on the strengths and achievements of ASEAN – whether it was the expansion of ASEAN itself, buttressing intra-ASEAN economic cooperation, engaging new partners in financial cooperation through the APT, or reaching out to the great powers in the form of the ARF.

Type
Chapter
Information
Crafting Cooperation
Regional International Institutions in Comparative Perspective
, pp. 32 - 82
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2007

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)
3
Cited by

Save book to Kindle

To save this book to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Available formats
×

Save book to Dropbox

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Available formats
×

Save book to Google Drive

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Available formats
×