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Chapter 16 - Ventricular Assist Device Implantation

from Section 2 - Anaesthesia for Specific Procedures

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  12 May 2020

Joseph Arrowsmith
Affiliation:
Royal Papworth Hospital, Cambridge
Andrew Roscoe
Affiliation:
Singapore General Hospital
Jonathan Mackay
Affiliation:
Royal Papworth Hospital, Cambridge
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Summary

Mechanical circulatory support (MCS) can be used in a setting of either acute or chronic heart failure in selected patients refractory to medical management, to augment the failing circulation due to pump failure and to avert organ failure. There are a variety of devices available, which may be employed for short- or long-term support. Longer-term support may only be afforded by a ventricular assist device (VAD) or cardiac transplantation. VADs are used most commonly for left ventricular support (LVADs), but may also be used for the RV (RVADs) or for biventricular support (BIVADs).

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Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2020

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References

Desai, SR, Hwang, NC. Advances in left ventricular assist devices and mechanical circulatory support. J Cardiothorac Vasc Anesth 2018; 32: 1193–213.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Feldman, D, Pamboukian, SV, Teuteberg, JJ, et al. The 2013 International Society for Heart and Lung Transplantation guidelines for mechanical circulatory support: executive summary. J Heart Lung Transplant 2013; 32: 157–87.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Lampert, BC. Perioperative management of the right and left ventricles. Cardiol Clin 2018; 36: 495506.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Rogers, JG, Pagani, FD, Tatooles, AJ, et al. Intrapericardial left ventricular assist device for advanced heart failure. N Engl J Med 2017; 376: 451–60.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Rose, EA, Gelijns, AC, Moskowitz, AJ, et al. Long-term use of a left ventricular assist device for end-stage heart failure. N Engl J Med 2001; 345: 1435-43.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed

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