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Chapter 24 - Temperature Management and Deep Hypothermic Arrest

from Section 5 - Cardiopulmonary Bypass

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  12 May 2020

Joseph Arrowsmith
Affiliation:
Royal Papworth Hospital, Cambridge
Andrew Roscoe
Affiliation:
Singapore General Hospital
Jonathan Mackay
Affiliation:
Royal Papworth Hospital, Cambridge
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Summary

In animals that maintain body temperature within a tight range (homeotherms), thermoregulation represents the balance between heat production (thermogenesis) and heat loss. Thermogenesis occurs as a result of metabolic activity, particularly in skeletal muscle, the kidneys, the brain, the liver and (in infants) adipose tissue. Body heat is lost by conduction, convection, radiation and evaporation (Table 24.1). Cold-induced hypothalamic stimulation activates autonomic, extra-pyramidal, endocrine and behavioural mechanisms to maintain the core temperature.

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Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2020

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References

Arrowsmith, JE, Hogue, CW. Deep hypothermic circulatory arrest. In Ghosh, S, Falter, F, Perrino, AC (eds), Cardiopulmonary Bypass, 2nd edn. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press; 2015, pp. 152–67.Google Scholar
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