Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-544b6db54f-4nk8m Total loading time: 1.155 Render date: 2021-10-24T12:48:52.819Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": true, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true, "newUsageEvents": true }

Chapter 2 - Symptoms and Signs of Cardiac Disease

from Section 1 - Routine Cardiac Surgery

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  12 May 2020

Joseph Arrowsmith
Affiliation:
Royal Papworth Hospital, Cambridge
Andrew Roscoe
Affiliation:
Singapore General Hospital
Jonathan Mackay
Affiliation:
Royal Papworth Hospital, Cambridge
Get access

Summary

Despite the widespread availability of investigational tests and imaging techniques for the diagnosis and management of cardiac disease, eliciting a comprehensive history and performing a systematic physical examination remain essential clinical skills.

Type
Chapter
Information
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2020

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

References

Campeau, L. Grading of angina pectoris. Circulation 1976; 54: 522–3.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Constant, J. Essentials of Bedside Cardiology, 2nd edn. Totowa, NJ: Humana Press; 2002.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
The Criteria Committee of the New York Heart Association. Nomenclature and Criteria for Diagnosis of Diseases of the Heart and Great Vessels, 9th edn. Boston, MA: Lippincott Williams and Wilkins; 1994.Google Scholar
Hlatky, MA, Boineau, RE, Higginbotham, MB, et al. A brief self-administered questionnaire to determine functional capacity (the Duke Activity Status Index). Am J Cardiol 1989; 64: 651–4.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Send book to Kindle

To send this book to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Available formats
×

Send book to Dropbox

To send content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Available formats
×

Send book to Google Drive

To send content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Available formats
×