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Chapter 17 - Heart Transplantation

from Section 2 - Anaesthesia for Specific Procedures

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  12 May 2020

Joseph Arrowsmith
Affiliation:
Royal Papworth Hospital, Cambridge
Andrew Roscoe
Affiliation:
Singapore General Hospital
Jonathan Mackay
Affiliation:
Royal Papworth Hospital, Cambridge
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Summary

The first successful human-to-human heart transplant was performed by Christiaan Barnard in 1967 but the initial outcomes were poor. The introduction of ciclosporin resulted in a significant improvement in survival, leading to an increase in heart transplantation through the 1980s. A total of 5,149 heart transplants, including 4,547 adult transplants, were performed at 302 transplant centres worldwide in the year to July 2017, with 86% 1-year survival, just over 50% survival at 10 years and a median survival of 11 years.

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Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2020

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References

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