Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Hostname: page-component-77c89778f8-n9wrp Total loading time: 0 Render date: 2024-07-21T22:52:24.564Z Has data issue: false hasContentIssue false

13 - Distributed cooperative routing

from Part III - Cooperative networking

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  06 July 2010

K. J. Ray Liu
Affiliation:
University of Maryland, College Park
Ahmed K. Sadek
Affiliation:
Qualcomm, San Diego, California
Weifeng Su
Affiliation:
State University of New York, Buffalo
Andres Kwasinski
Affiliation:
Texas Instruments, Germantown, Maryland
Get access

Summary

Routing is the process of transferring data packets from one terminal to another. Routing aims to find the optimal path according to some criterion. Shortest-path routing is a common scheme used for routing in data networks. It depends on assigning a length to each link in the network. A path made up of a series of links will have a path length equal to the sum of the lengths of the links in the route. Then, it chooses the path between source and destination that has the shortest route. The shortest-path route can be implemented using one of two well-known techniques, namely, the Bellman–Ford algorithm or the Dijkstra's algorithm [11].

In mobile ad hoc networks (MANETs), data packet transmissions between source and destination nodes are done through relaying the data packets by intermediate nodes. Hence, the source needs to locate the destination and set up a path to reach it. There are two types of routing algorithms in MANETs, namely, table-based and on-demand algorithms. In table-based routing algorithms, each node in the network stores a routing table, which indicates the geographic locations of each node in the network. These routing tables are updated periodically, through a special HELLO message sent by every node. Table-based routing protocols for MANETs include the destination sequence distance vector routing protocol (DSDV), wireless routing protocol (WRP), and cluster-head gateway switch routing (CGSR). The periodical updating of the routing tables makes table-based routing algorithms inefficient.

Type
Chapter
Information
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2008

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

Save book to Kindle

To save this book to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Available formats
×

Save book to Dropbox

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Available formats
×

Save book to Google Drive

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Available formats
×