Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-99c86f546-8r8mm Total loading time: 0.261 Render date: 2021-12-03T12:02:20.737Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": true, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true, "newUsageEvents": true }

9 - Adaptive resource allocation in cooperative cellular networks

from Part III - Relay-based cooperative cellular wireless networks

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  03 May 2011

Wei Yu
Affiliation:
University of Toronto, Canada
Taesoo Kwon
Affiliation:
Samsung Electronics, Korea
Changyong Shin
Affiliation:
Samsung Electronics, Korea
Ekram Hossain
Affiliation:
University of Manitoba, Canada
Dong In Kim
Affiliation:
Sungkyunkwan University, Korea
Vijay K. Bhargava
Affiliation:
University of British Columbia, Vancouver
Get access

Summary

Introduction

The cellular structure is a central concept in wireless network deployment. A wireless cellular network comprises base stations geographically located at the centre of each cell serving users within the cell boundary. The assignment of the users to the base stations depends on the relative channel propagation characteristics. As a mobile device can usually receive signals from multiple base stations, the mobile is typically assigned to the base station with the strongest channel gain. Signals from all other base stations are regarded as intercell interference. However, at the cell edge, it is often the case that the propagation path-losses from two or more base stations are similar. In this case, the signal-to-noise-and-interference ratio (SINR) could be close to 0 dB, even if the mobile is assigned to the strongest base station. To avoid excessive intercell interference in these cases, traditional cellular networks employ a fixed frequency reuse pattern so that neighboring base stations do not share the same frequency. In this manner, neighboring cells are separated in frequency so that cell-edge users do not interfere with each other.

The traditional fixed frequency reuse schemes are effective in minimizing intercell interference, but are also resource intensive in the sense that each cell requires a substantial amount of nonoverlapping bandwidth, so that only a fraction of the total bandwidth can be made available for each cell. Consequently, the standardization processes for future wireless systems have increasingly targeted maximal frequency reuse, where all cells use the same frequency everywhere.

Type
Chapter
Information
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2011

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)
4
Cited by

Send book to Kindle

To send this book to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Available formats
×

Send book to Dropbox

To send content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Available formats
×

Send book to Google Drive

To send content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Available formats
×