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Chapter 3 - Cooperative Movements in the Republic of Korea

from Section 1 - Cooperative Issues in a Global Overview

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  05 September 2012

Patrizia Battilani
Affiliation:
Università di Bologna
Harm G. Schröter
Affiliation:
Universitetet i Bergen, Norway
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Summary

This chapter explores the historical development of cooperativism in Korea which has cultural characteristics different from those of the Western world. Financial cooperatives began operation in rural areas in 1907, three years prior to Chosun being completely integrated into the Japanese economy, and were extended to urban areas in 1918. No autonomous and civil cooperatives appeared in Chosun until 1920 when a few consumer cooperatives were established in Kyungsung and in Mokpo by some grassroots pioneers pursuing political independence through economic independence. In Korea, state influence on the cooperative sector was to become a permanent characteristic. In the sector of savings and credit cooperatives, there is a strong separation between the agricultural cooperatives of the national agricultural cooperative federation (NACF), CUs, and credit cooperatives (CCs), although they share similar goals and guiding principles, have overlapping membership, and are facing the same stiff competition from commercial banks.
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Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2012

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