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3 - Nations, Borders, and Islands

from Part I

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  06 January 2022

Clare Anderson
Affiliation:
University of Leicester
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Summary

Chapter 3 examines the scope, scale, and experience of convict mobility in the expansionist regimes of mid-Qing China, post-Meiji restoration Japan, continental Europe, and the independent nation states of Colombia, Ecuador, Bolivia, Chile, Argentina, Mexico, and Peru. Covering the period from the eighteenth to twentieth centuries, it shows that government sent convicts over long distances, including to borders and offshore islands, for a combination of reasons. This included the management of troublesome or insurgent populations, the occupation and development of geo-political frontiers, the encouragement of free migration, and the appropriation of convict labour. Engaged in global conversations about punishment, governments also used punitive mobility to inflict severe punishment, provide a strong deterrent against crime, and in some cases to rehabilitate offenders. However, these various objectives were not always compatible, and convict agency sometimes compromised their success. For these reasons, the chapter argues that it is useful to conceptualize convict mobility as a system operated by a range of stakeholders who did not always have identical desires and goals regarding governance, punishment, work, and geo-political expansion, and resisted and subverted by convicts in similarly diverse ways.

Type
Chapter
Information
Convicts
A Global History
, pp. 73 - 99
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2022

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