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Contested collisions

An introduction

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  05 May 2016

Kerstin Blome
Affiliation:
Universität Bremen
Andreas Fischer-Lescano
Affiliation:
Universität Bremen
Hannah Franzki
Affiliation:
Birkbeck College, University of London
Nora Markard
Affiliation:
Universität Hamburg
Stefan Oeter
Affiliation:
Universität Hamburg
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Contested Regime Collisions
Norm Fragmentation in World Society
, pp. 1 - 18
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2016

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References

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