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9 - Diffusion of Protest

from Part III - Sources of Protest

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  13 August 2020

Hanspeter Kriesi
Affiliation:
European University Institute, Florence
Jasmine Lorenzini
Affiliation:
Université de Genève
Bruno Wüest
Affiliation:
Universität Zürich
Silja Hausermann
Affiliation:
Université de Genève
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Summary

This chapter contains a study of diffusion among political protests in Europe. We start from a theoretical perspective that assumes protests as inherently interdependent across countries. Hence, we link geographical proximity to the likelihood of protests and we apply a spatial panel data analysis to study this link at the European, regional and cross-border level as well as for different time periods and forms of protests. The results show that spin-off movements across the continent learn from or emulate initiator movements in many instances, but that this diffusion is largely confined to the cross-border level. As a consequence, we did not find sustained protest waves that capture the majority of European countries at once. Similarly, cross-border diffusion is also only relevant for some regions and during some time periods but not universally. It seems that the grievances and opportunity structures in different European countries are varying too much in order to support widespread and long-ranging waves of protest.

Type
Chapter
Information
Contention in Times of Crisis
Recession and Political Protest in Thirty European Countries
, pp. 206 - 224
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2020

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