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11 - Governing Nontraditional Gene Editing

from Part III - Tinkering with Ourselves: The Law and Ethics of DIY Genomics

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  27 August 2021

I. Glenn Cohen
Affiliation:
Harvard Law School, Massachusetts
Nita A. Farahany
Affiliation:
Duke University School of Law
Henry T. Greely
Affiliation:
Stanford University School of Law
Carmel Shachar
Affiliation:
Harvard Law School, Massachusetts
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Summary

A large and highly heterogeneous group of individuals conducts genetic and genomic research outside of traditional corporate and academic settings. They can be an important source of innovation, but their activities largely take place beyond the purview of existing regulatory systems for promoting safe and ethical practices. Historically the gene-targeting technology available for non-traditional biology (NTB) experiments has been limited, and therefore they have attracted little regulatory attention. New techniques such as CRISPR-cas9, however, may create a need for alternate governance approaches. This chapter explores whether alternate governance approaches might be needed and, if so, what governance approaches would be most likely to enable non-traditional experiments to be conducted safely and ethically.

Type
Chapter
Information
Consumer Genetic Technologies
Ethical and Legal Considerations
, pp. 145 - 156
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2021

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