Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-59b7f5684b-qn7h5 Total loading time: 0.97 Render date: 2022-09-30T12:19:15.587Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "useRatesEcommerce": false, "displayNetworkTab": true, "displayNetworkMapGraph": false, "useSa": true } hasContentIssue true

12 - Finding a Regulatory Balance for Genetic Biohacking

from Part III - Tinkering with Ourselves: The Law and Ethics of DIY Genomics

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  27 August 2021

I. Glenn Cohen
Affiliation:
Harvard Law School, Massachusetts
Nita A. Farahany
Affiliation:
Duke University School of Law
Henry T. Greely
Affiliation:
Stanford University School of Law
Carmel Shachar
Affiliation:
Harvard Law School, Massachusetts
Get access

Summary

The rise and ease of genome-editing technologies, like CRISPR, has ushered in communities of “biohackers,” do-it-yourself enthusiasts for molecular genetics who perform experiments outside traditional institutional laboratory settings. Conventional wisdom posits that such research is beyond traditional modes of regulation or legal enforcement and that new biohacking laws are needed. This view, however, is incorrect; both public and private regulators currently possess–and in other contexts, use–many of the tools needed to regulate the safety and ethics of biohacking. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration, for example, has expansive authority over “biologics,” which includes many of the biohacking kits currently in use. Patent holders and community laboratories similarly have the power to impose ethical and safety restrictions on biohacking activities. Rather than new laws or stiffer enforcement, regulators should do what they do for other industries: actively engage with the community to educate and promote the advancement of technology.

Type
Chapter
Information
Consumer Genetic Technologies
Ethical and Legal Considerations
, pp. 157 - 168
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2021

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

Save book to Kindle

To save this book to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Available formats
×

Save book to Dropbox

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Available formats
×

Save book to Google Drive

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Available formats
×