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6 - Minority and multi-party government

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  05 August 2015

Brian Galligan
Affiliation:
University of Melbourne
Scott Brenton
Affiliation:
Australian National University, Canberra
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Constitutional Conventions in Westminster Systems
Controversies, Changes and Challenges
, pp. 116 - 136
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2015

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References

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Boston, Jonathan 2011. ‘Government formation in New Zealand under MMP: Theory and practice’, Political Science 63 (1): 79105.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Boston, Jonathan and Bullock, David 2010. ‘Multi-party governance: Managing the unity-distinctiveness dilemma in executive coalitions’, Party Politics 18 (3): 349–68.Google Scholar
Brenton, Scott 2013. ‘Policy traps for third parties in two-party systems: The Australian case’, Commonwealth & Comparative Politics 51 (3): 283305.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
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Costar, Brian 2011. ‘Australia’s curious coalition’, Political Science 63 (1): 2944.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Curtin, Jennifer and Miller, Raymond 2011. ‘Negotiating coalitions: Comparative perspective’. Political Science 63 (1): 39.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Lijphart, Arend 1999. Patterns of Democracy: Government Forms and Performance in Thirty-Six Countries. New Haven and London: Yale University Press.Google Scholar
Lijphart, Arend 2012. Patterns of Democracy: Government Forms and Performance in Thirty-Six Countries. New Haven and London: Yale University Press.Google Scholar
Parliament of Canada 2014. Parliament File. Ottawa: Library of Parliament (Bibliothèque du Parlement), www.parl.gc.ca/parlinfo/Lists/Parliament.aspx.
Paun, Akash 2011. ‘After the age of majority? Multi-party governance and the Westminster model’, Commonwealth & Comparative Politics 49 (4): 440–56.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Paun, Akash and Hazell, Robert 2010. ‘Hung parliaments and the challenges for Westminster and Whitehall: How to make minority and multiparty governance work’, Political Quarterly 8 (2): 213–22.Google Scholar
Strøm, Kaare, Budge, Ian and Laver, Michael J. 1994. ‘Constraints on cabinet formation in parliamentary democracies’, American Journal of Political Science 38 (2): 303–35.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
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