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3 - Executive conventions

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  05 August 2015

Brian Galligan
Affiliation:
University of Melbourne
Scott Brenton
Affiliation:
Australian National University, Canberra
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Constitutional Conventions in Westminster Systems
Controversies, Changes and Challenges
, pp. 51 - 71
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2015

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References

Advisory Committee on Executive Government. 1887. Report. Queensland Government.
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Constitutional Commission 1988. Final Report of the Constitutional Commission, Volume I. Canberra: Australian Government Publishing Service.
Dicey, A.V. [1885] 1973. Introduction to the Study of the Law of the Constitution, 10th edn. Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
Evatt, H.V. 1936. The King and His Dominion Governors. Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
Galligan, Brian 1991. ‘Australia’, in Butler, David and Low, D.A. (eds.), Sovereigns and Surrogates: Constitutional Heads of State in the Commonwealth. London: Macmillan, 61107.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Galligan, Brian and Brenton, Scott 2013. The Political Theory of Constitutional Conventions. Paper presented to the Australian Political Studies Association Conference. Hobart, 2013.
Hardin, Russell 2013. ‘Why a Constitution?’, in Galligan, Denis and Versteeg, Mila (eds.), Social and Political Foundations of Constitutions. Cambridge University Press, 5172.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Hocking, Jenny 2012. Gough Whitlam: His Time: The Biography, Volume II. Melbourne University Publishing/Miegunyah Press.Google Scholar
Knopff, Rainer and Snow, Dave 2013. ‘“Harper’s New Rules” for Government Formation Fact or Fiction?’, Canadian Parliamentary Review 36: 1827.Google Scholar
Lindell, Geoffrey 2014. ‘Judicial Review and the Dismissal of an Elected Government in 1975: Then and Now?’, Australian Bar Review 38: 118.Google Scholar
Low, D.A. 1987. ‘A List of Episodes, Appendix III’, Report of the Advisory Committee to the Constitutional Commission. Canberra: AGPS, 83–4.Google Scholar
Marshall, Geoffrey and Moodie, Graeme C. 1967. Some Problems of the Constitution. London: Hutchinson.Google Scholar
Sampford, C.J.G. 1987. ‘“Recognise and Declare”: An Australian Experiment in Codifying Conventions’, Oxford Journal of Legal Studies 7: 369.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Sir Smith, David 2005. Head of State: The Governor-General, the Monarchy, the Republic and the Dismissal. Sydney: Macleay Press.Google Scholar

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