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Part III - Collecting and Analysing Data

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  07 August 2023

Hannah Hughes
Affiliation:
Aberystwyth University
Alice B. M. Vadrot
Affiliation:
Universität Wien, Austria
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Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2023

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References

Further Reading

1.Paltridge, B. (2012). Discourse analysis: An introduction. London: Bloomsbury Publishing.Google Scholar
A useful practical guide that provides overview of various types of discourse analysis.Google Scholar
2.Johnstone, B. (2017). Discourse analysis. Hoboken, NJ: John Wiley & Sons.Google Scholar
This book includes theoretical and practical advice on how to locate context, roles, and power in text.Google Scholar
3.Kuckartz, U. (2014). Qualitative text analysis: A guide to methods, practice and using software. Sage.Google Scholar
This book provides a wide-ranging look at qualitative text analysis, including hermeneutics, various qualitative text analysis methods, and computer assistance. It provides practical advice throughout.Google Scholar
4.Grimmer, J., and Stewart, B. M. (2013). Text as data: The promise and pitfalls of automatic content analysis methods for political texts. Political Analysis, 21(3),267297.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
For those considering using computer models to identify commonalities or patterns in large amounts of text, this is a helpful resource on the use of such techniques.Google Scholar

References

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Further Reading

1.Burnham, P., Gilland Lutz, K., Grant, W. and Layton-Henry, Z. (2008). Elite Interviewing. In Burnham, P., Gilland Lutz, K, Grant, W, and Layton-Henry, Z (eds.), Research Methods in Politics. 1st ed. Basingstoke: Red Globe Press, pp. 231–46.Google Scholar
The chapter is an accessible and relatively short introduction to the technique and various steps of elite interviewing for political science research.Google Scholar
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This paper discusses the personal experiences of the authors – who are legal researchers – in respect of expert interviews.Google Scholar
3.Mosley, L., ed. (2013). Interview Research in Political Science. Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press.Google Scholar
The book aims to provide a comprehensive guide to graduate students and faculty on interview-based research in political science.Google Scholar

References

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Further Reading

1.Campbell, L. M., Corson, C., Gray, N. J., MacDonald, K. I., and Brosius, J. P. (2014) Studying global environmental meetings to understand global environmental governance: Collaborative event ethnography at the tenth conference of the parties to the convention on biological diversity. Global Environmental Politics, 14(3), 120.Google Scholar
This special issue includes a collection of articles that emerged from a collaborative event ethnography at one site: the Tenth Conference of Parties to the Convention on Biological Diversity. It provides an introduction into the diverse ways in which scholars have used ethnography at a global agreement-making site.Google Scholar
2.Emerson, R. M., Fretz, R. I., and Shaw, L. L. (2011). Writing Ethnographic Fieldnotes. Chicago, IL: University of Chicago Press.Google Scholar
This volume is a must-have practical guide for researchers engaging ethnography. It covers the entire ethnographic process from research development to data collection, analysis, and write-up.Google Scholar
3.Lightfoot, S. (2016). Global Indigenous Politics: A Subtle Revolution. London: Routledge.Google Scholar
4.Pachirat, T. (2017). Among Wolves: Ethnography and the Immersive Study of Power. New York: Routledge.Google Scholar
This book presents ethnography in a six-act play, drawing the reader deeply into the various ethical, epistemological, and practical considerations that ethnographers confront. It helps students understand what it means to cultivate an ethnographic sensibility.Google Scholar
5.Tuhiwai Smith, L. (2021). Decolonizing Methodologies: Research and Indigenous Peoples. London: Zed Books Ltd.Google Scholar
This volume is essential for all researchers, especially those who study power and politics. By engaging researchers in questions of how, why, and with/for whom we do research, Tuhiwai Smith demonstrates how researchers can and should practice iterative reflexivity throughout their work.Google Scholar

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Further Reading

1.Choy, T. K., Faier, L., Hathaway, M. J. et al. (2009a). Strong Collaboration as a Method for Multi-Sited Ethnography: On Mycorrhizal Relations. In Falzon, M.-A. (Ed.), Multi-Sited Ethnography: Theory, Praxis and Locality in Contemporary Research. New York: Routledge, pp. 197214.Google Scholar
For those readers interested in strong collaboration, and how it differs from more common models of collaboration, this chapter elaborates on the relevant methodological and theoretical considerations.Google Scholar
2.Corson, C., Campbell, L. M., Wilshusen, P., and Gray, N. J. (2019). Assembling Global Conservation Governance. Geoforum 103, 5665.Google Scholar
In this paper, we elaborate on how the concept of “assemblage” can be used to understand GEG. We also consider the iterative development of theory and methodology in CEE in more detail.Google Scholar
3.Erickson, K., and Stull, D. (1998). Doing Team Ethnography: Warnings and Advice. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.Google Scholar
For those interested in conducting CEE, this book provides more extensive and detailed advice regarding how to conduct ethnography collaboratively.Google Scholar
4.Sword, H. (2017). Air & Light & Time & Space: How Successful Academics Write. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.Google Scholar
See, in particular, chapter 8 (pp. 123–134), which reflects on the collaborative writing process, including challenges, positive aspects, approaches, and resources for further reflection and learning. Chapter 9 (pp. 135–146) explores the benefits of writing retreats.Google Scholar

References

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Further Reading

1.Borgatti, S., Everett, M., and Freeman, L. (2002). Ucinet for Windows: Software for Social Network Analysis. Harvard, MA: Analytic Technologies.Google Scholar
This is the “entry level” software for carrying out SNA. It is simple to use and generates both statistical analysis and network visualizations. It can be downloaded here: https://sites.google.com/site/ucinetsoftware/home.Google Scholar
2.Borgatti, S., Everett, M., and Johnson, J. (2018). Analyzing Social Networks. London: Sage.Google Scholar
This is specifically designed to introduce you to the ucinet software.Google Scholar
3.Hadden, J. (2015). Networks in Contention. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
This is a particularly fine use of SNA in relation to environmental negotiations. It tracks NGO and social movement activism at UNFCCC COPs, and it shows how the spread of more confrontational tactics amongst movement actors in the run-up to the Copenhagen COP in 2009 was shaped by the structure of the networks of NGOs.Google Scholar
4.Scott, J. (2012). Social Network Analysis. Los Angeles, CA: Sage.Google Scholar
This is a readable, clear textbook on SNA, describing its underlying assumptions, key concepts and terms, and basic procedures regarding data collection analysis extremely effectively.Google Scholar

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