Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Hostname: page-component-77c89778f8-n9wrp Total loading time: 0 Render date: 2024-07-19T06:15:59.259Z Has data issue: false hasContentIssue false

Preface

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  05 August 2016

Carlos Closa
Affiliation:
European University Institute, Florence
Lorenzo Casini
Affiliation:
Università degli Studi di Roma 'La Sapienza', Italy
Carlos Closa
Affiliation:
European University Institute
Lorenzo Casini
Affiliation:
Università degli Studi di Roma 'La Sapienza', Italy
Omri Sender
Affiliation:
George Washington University, Washington DC
Get access

Summary

States formalize their cooperative relations with the aim of providing, together, certain public goods that they cannot provide in isolation. The range of these goods is greatly varied, encompassing security, identity and religion; and development, infrastructure and regulatory frameworks for trade, labor or air transport, for instance. To this end, States accept to be bound by formal arrangements whereby they commit to deliver these goods, but also to respect the agreements concluded. Formal institutions respond precisely to these needs for provision and commitment.

Globalization has underlined the inability of States to provide goods in isolation and has hence accelerated legal integration at international and supranational levels: the number of international institutions – now over 60,000 – began growing after the Second World War and is still rising; the relations between State administrations and international institutions are becoming ever more numerous; forms of regional organization have been spreading; new forms of global networks and global “administrations” have been developing.

As a consequence, scholars worldwide have devoted themselves to studying global governance, international organizations (IOs) and regionalism. From these various perspectives, what has emerged clearly is that a mono-disciplinary approach is not capable of capturing all the implications related to these issues, which means that it becomes crucial to combine different fields of research. In this context, the use of concepts derived from both political science and law has turned out to be extremely effective, such as in the case of regime theory being used to explain the formation of global regulatory systems. This is why this book presents these two perspectives jointly, in its endeavor to define models of international and supranational legal integration.

Our aim, therefore, is threefold. First, we map and outline models of regional integration by studying their institutional design and processes of governance. Second, we extend our analysis to IOs and other international regimes, to identify which techniques are capable of governing complex global legal systems. Third, we offer a toolbox of institutional processes and legal mechanisms, which may be adopted by current or new projects of international and supranational integration, such as ASEAN. We address these aims in two chapters, both based on the idea that integration is a formal process.

Type
Chapter
Information
Comparative Regional Integration
Governance and Legal Models
, pp. xxi - xxviii
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2016

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

Save book to Kindle

To save this book to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

  • Preface
  • Carlos Closa, European University Institute, Florence, Lorenzo Casini, Università degli Studi di Roma 'La Sapienza', Italy
  • With Omri Sender, George Washington University, Washington DC
  • Book: Comparative Regional Integration
  • Online publication: 05 August 2016
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9781316442777.002
Available formats
×

Save book to Dropbox

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

  • Preface
  • Carlos Closa, European University Institute, Florence, Lorenzo Casini, Università degli Studi di Roma 'La Sapienza', Italy
  • With Omri Sender, George Washington University, Washington DC
  • Book: Comparative Regional Integration
  • Online publication: 05 August 2016
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9781316442777.002
Available formats
×

Save book to Google Drive

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

  • Preface
  • Carlos Closa, European University Institute, Florence, Lorenzo Casini, Università degli Studi di Roma 'La Sapienza', Italy
  • With Omri Sender, George Washington University, Washington DC
  • Book: Comparative Regional Integration
  • Online publication: 05 August 2016
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9781316442777.002
Available formats
×