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Coaggregation and coadhesion in oral biofilms

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  03 June 2010

Pual E. Kolenbrander
Affiliation:
Oral Infection and Immunity Branch, National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA
Roxanna N. Andersen
Affiliation:
Oral Infection and Immunity Branch, National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA
Karen M. Kazmerzak
Affiliation:
Oral Infection and Immunity Branch, National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA
Robert J. Palmer Jr
Affiliation:
Oral Infection and Immunity Branch, National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA
David G. Allison
Affiliation:
University of Manchester
P. Gilbert
Affiliation:
University of Manchester
H. M. Lappin-Scott
Affiliation:
University of Exeter
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Summary

COAGGREGATION AND COADHESION

Certain molecules on the surfaces of human oral bacteria can be recognized by cognate surface components of genetically distinct cells, which bind to form networks of cell–cell interactions. When these interactions occur in suspension, they are called coaggregations (Kolenbrander, 1988). When the interaction occurs between suspended or planktonic cells and already adherent cells, it is called coadhesion (Bos et al., 1994). Coadhesion may involve the accretion of an already formed coaggregate onto a biofilm, which is an assemblage of living cells on a substratum, or onto a virgin surface.

Coaggregation among human oral bacteria was first described 30 years ago (Gibbons & Nygaard, 1970). Coaggregation is measured by several methods, including visual inspection of clumps or coaggregates after mixing dense suspensions of two cell types (Gibbons & Nygaard, 1970), turbidometric measurement of supernatant after slowspeed centrifugation to pellet the coaggregates (McIntire et al., 1978), filtration through specific pore size to separate single cells from coaggregates (Lancy et al., 1980), distribution of radiolabelled cells of one cell type in coaggregates and supernatant after slow-speed centrifugation (Kolenbrander & Andersen, 1986) and binding of a radiolabelled cell type to partner cells immobilized on a nitrocellulose membrane (Lamont & Rosan, 1990). Coaggregations may be unimodal or bimodal (Kolenbrander, 1997). Unimodal coaggregations involve protease-sensitive molecules on the cell surface of one of the partners recognizing their cognate receptors (protease-insensitive) on the other partner's cell surface. Bimodal coaggregations involve more than one of the unimodal mechanisms. For example, one partner expresses both an adhesin and a non-cognate receptor. Its partner expresses the respective cognates for the adhesin and receptor.

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Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2000

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  • Coaggregation and coadhesion in oral biofilms
    • By Pual E. Kolenbrander, Oral Infection and Immunity Branch, National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA, Roxanna N. Andersen, Oral Infection and Immunity Branch, National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA, Karen M. Kazmerzak, Oral Infection and Immunity Branch, National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA, Robert J. Palmer, Jr, Oral Infection and Immunity Branch, National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA
  • Edited by David G. Allison, University of Manchester, P. Gilbert, University of Manchester, H. M. Lappin-Scott, University of Exeter, M. Wilson
  • Book: Community Structure and Co-operation in Biofilms
  • Online publication: 03 June 2010
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511754814.006
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  • Coaggregation and coadhesion in oral biofilms
    • By Pual E. Kolenbrander, Oral Infection and Immunity Branch, National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA, Roxanna N. Andersen, Oral Infection and Immunity Branch, National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA, Karen M. Kazmerzak, Oral Infection and Immunity Branch, National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA, Robert J. Palmer, Jr, Oral Infection and Immunity Branch, National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA
  • Edited by David G. Allison, University of Manchester, P. Gilbert, University of Manchester, H. M. Lappin-Scott, University of Exeter, M. Wilson
  • Book: Community Structure and Co-operation in Biofilms
  • Online publication: 03 June 2010
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511754814.006
Available formats
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Send book to Google Drive

To send content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

  • Coaggregation and coadhesion in oral biofilms
    • By Pual E. Kolenbrander, Oral Infection and Immunity Branch, National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA, Roxanna N. Andersen, Oral Infection and Immunity Branch, National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA, Karen M. Kazmerzak, Oral Infection and Immunity Branch, National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA, Robert J. Palmer, Jr, Oral Infection and Immunity Branch, National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA
  • Edited by David G. Allison, University of Manchester, P. Gilbert, University of Manchester, H. M. Lappin-Scott, University of Exeter, M. Wilson
  • Book: Community Structure and Co-operation in Biofilms
  • Online publication: 03 June 2010
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511754814.006
Available formats
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