Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-544b6db54f-rcd7l Total loading time: 0.731 Render date: 2021-10-19T20:03:12.508Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": true, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true, "newUsageEvents": true }

Chapter 12 - Women with Epilepsy

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  22 May 2018

Dieter Schmidt
Affiliation:
Epilepsy Research Group, Free University of Berlin
William O. Tatum
Affiliation:
Department of Neurology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston
Steven Schachter
Affiliation:
Department of Neurology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston
Get access
Type
Chapter
Information
Common Epilepsy Pitfalls
Case-Based Learning
, pp. 189 - 203
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2018

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

References

AAN. Practice parameter. Management issues for women with epilepsy (summary statement). Report of the Quality Standard Subcommittee of the American Academy of Neurology. Neurology 1998;51: 944–8.
Abassi, F., Kumholz, A., Kittner, S. J., Langenberg, P. Effects of menopause on seizures in women with epilepsy. Epilepsia 1999 Feb; 40(2): 205–10.Google Scholar
Carlson, C., Anderson, C. T. Special issues in epilepsy: the elderly, the immunocompromised, and bone health. Continuum (Minneap Minn) 2016;22(1): 246–61.Google ScholarPubMed
Crawford, P. Best practice guidelines for the management of women with epilepsy. Epilepsia 2005;46(9): 117–24.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Duncan, S. Polycystic ovarian syndrome in women with epilepsy: a review. Epilepsia 2001;42(suppl 3): 60–5.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Erel, T., Guralp, O. Epilepsy and menopause. Arch Gynecol Obstet 2011;284(3): 749–55.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Gerard, E. E., Meador, K. J. Managing epilepsy in women. Continuum (Minneap Minn) 2016;22(1): 204–26.Google ScholarPubMed
Harden, C. L. Sexuality in women with epilepsy. Epilepsy Behav 2005;(suppl 2): S2–6.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Harden, C. L., Koppel, B. S., Herzog, A. G., Nikolov, B. G., Hauser, W. A. Seizure frequency is associated with age of menopause in women with epilepsy. Neurology 2003;61(4): 451–5.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Harden, C. L., Meador, K. J., Pennell, P. B., et al. Practice parameter update: management issues for women with epilepsy – focus on pregnancy (an evidence-based review): teratogenesis and perinatal outcomes. Report of the Quality Standards Subcommittee and Therapeutics and Technology Assessment Subcommittee of the American Academy of Neurology and American Epilepsy Society. Neurology 2009a; 73: 133–41.Google ScholarPubMed
Harden, C. L., Pennell, P. B., Koppel, B. S., et al. Practice parameter update: management issues for women with epilepsy-focus on pregnancy (an evidence-based review): vitamin K, folic acid, blood levels, breastfeeding. Report of the Quality Standards Subcommittee and Therapeutics and Technology Assessment Subcommittee of the American Academy of Neurology and American Epilepsy Society. Neurology 2009b; 73(2): 142–9.Google ScholarPubMed
Hernandez-Dıaz, S., Smith, C. R., Shen, A., et al. Comparative safety of antiepileptic drugs during pregnancy. Neurology 2012;78: 1692–9.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Herzog, A. G. Catamenial epilepsy: update on prevalence, pathophysiology and treatment from the findings of the NIH Progesterone Treatment Trial. Seizure 2015;28: 1825.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Herzog, A. G., Mandle, H. B., Cahill, K. E., et al. Contraceptive practices of women with epilepsy: findings of the epilepsy birth control registry. Epilepsia 2016;57(4): 630–7.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Holmes, L. B., Wyszynski, D. F., Lieberman, E. The AED (antiepileptic drug) pregnancy registry: a 6-year experience. Arch Neurol 2004;61: 673–8.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Huang, S. Y., Lo, P.-H., Liu, W.-M., et al. Outcomes after nonobstetric surgery in pregnant patients: a nationwide study. Mayo Clin Proc 2016;91(9): 1166–72.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Ip, S., Chung, M., Raman, G., et al. A summary of the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality's evidence report on breast feeding in developed countries. Breastfeed Med 2009;4(suppl 1): 517–30.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Masreflli, L., Pezzetta, F. Polycystic ovary syndrome. N Engl J Med 2005;352: 2756–7.Google ScholarPubMed
Meador, K. J., Baker, B. A., Browning, N., et al. Breastfeeding in children of women taking antiepileptic drugs: cognitive outcomes at age 6 years. JAMA Pediatr 2014;168(8): 729–36.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Mikati, M. A., Dib, L., Yamout, B., et al. Two randomized vitamin D trials in ambulatory patients on anticonvulsants: impact on bone. Neurology 2006;67(11): 2005–14.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Morrell, M. J. Epilepsy in women: the science of why it is special. Neurology 1999;53: S28–42.Google ScholarPubMed
Pack, A., Morrell, M. Treatment of women with epilepsy. Semin Neurol 2002;2(3): 289–98.Google Scholar
Pack, A., Morrell, M. Epilepsy and bone health in adults. Epilepsy Behav 2004;5(2): 24–9.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Pennell, P. B. Hormonal aspects of epilepsy. Neurol Clin 2009;27: 125.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Ray, J. G., Vermeulen, M. J., Bharatha, A., Montanera, W. J., Park, A. L.. Association between MRI exposure during pregnancy and fetal and childhood outcomes. JAMA 2016;316(9): 952–61.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Reddy, D. S. Role of neurosteroids in catamenial epilepsy. Epilepsy Res 2004 Dec; 62(2–3): 99118.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Sheth, R. D., Binkley, N., Hermann, B. P. Progressive bone deficit in epilepsy. Neurology 2008;70(3): 170–6.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Tomson, T., Battino, D., Bonizzoni, E., et al. Dose-dependent risk of malformations with antiepileptic drugs: an analysis of data from the EURAP epilepsy and pregnancy registry. Lancet Neurol 2011;10: 609–17.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Valera-Gran, D., Garcia de la Hera, M., Navarrete-Munoz, E. M., et al. Folic acid supplements during pregnancy and child psychomotor development after the first year of life. JAMA Pediatr 2014;168(11): e142611.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Veiby, G., Engelsen, B. A., Gilhus, N. E. Early child development and exposure to antiepileptic drugs prenatally and through breastfeeding: a prospective cohort study on children of women with epilepsy. JAMA Neurol 2013;70(11): 1367–74.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Winterbottom, J., Smyth, R., Jacoby, A., et al. The effectiveness of preconception counseling to reduce adverse pregnancy outcome in women with epilepsy: what's the evidence? Epilepsy Behav 2009;14: 273–9.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed

Send book to Kindle

To send this book to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Available formats
×

Send book to Dropbox

To send content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Available formats
×

Send book to Google Drive

To send content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Available formats
×