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Bibliography

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  21 July 2022

Esme Cleall
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University of Sheffield
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Colonising Disability
Impairment and Otherness Across Britain and Its Empire, c. 1800–1914
, pp. 252 - 284
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2022

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References

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