Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-99c86f546-pkshj Total loading time: 0.507 Render date: 2021-11-30T13:28:39.392Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": true, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true, "newUsageEvents": true }

5 - On Artifacts and Agency

The Mesopotamian Mīs Pî Ritual, Biblical Idol Polemics, and Belief in Cult Statues

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  17 September 2020

Brett E. Maiden
Affiliation:
Emory University, Atlanta
Get access

Summary

This chapter likewise draws on ancient visual and material culture in order to examine the worship of divine cult statues in Mesopotamia, the anti-idol polemics in the Bible, and the power of images and ritual activities in the construction of religious beliefs. In particular, the ancient Mesopotamian “washing of the mouth” ritual is studied within a cognitive framework. The discussion highlights both the intuitive and non-intuitive (i.e., costly) aspects of the belief in divine cult statues, and proceeds to examine both the cognitive process and cultural mechanisms that contribute to the belief that an inanimate statue is or becomes the deity. In doing so, the chapter adds a nuanced layer to the nature of belief and also problematizes certain scholarly views about belief in cult statues in ancient Mesopotamia and Israel.

Type
Chapter
Information
Cognitive Science and Ancient Israelite Religion
New Perspectives on Texts, Artifacts, and Culture
, pp. 177 - 210
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2020

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

Send book to Kindle

To send this book to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

  • On Artifacts and Agency
  • Brett E. Maiden, Emory University, Atlanta
  • Book: Cognitive Science and Ancient Israelite Religion
  • Online publication: 17 September 2020
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/9781108767972.005
Available formats
×

Send book to Dropbox

To send content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

  • On Artifacts and Agency
  • Brett E. Maiden, Emory University, Atlanta
  • Book: Cognitive Science and Ancient Israelite Religion
  • Online publication: 17 September 2020
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/9781108767972.005
Available formats
×

Send book to Google Drive

To send content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

  • On Artifacts and Agency
  • Brett E. Maiden, Emory University, Atlanta
  • Book: Cognitive Science and Ancient Israelite Religion
  • Online publication: 17 September 2020
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/9781108767972.005
Available formats
×