Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-684899dbb8-mhx7p Total loading time: 0.48 Render date: 2022-05-19T18:52:09.385Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "useRatesEcommerce": false, "useNewApi": true }

14 - Specific developmental disorders of speech and language

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  06 August 2009

Joseph H. Beitchman
Affiliation:
Department of Speech and Language Pathology, University of Toronto, Canada Child and Family Studies Centre, Ontario, Canada
Christopher Gillberg
Affiliation:
Göteborgs Universitet, Sweden
Richard Harrington
Affiliation:
University of Manchester
Hans-Christoph Steinhausen
Affiliation:
Universität Zürich
Get access

Summary

Introduction

The communication skills of listening and speaking are basic to virtually every aspect of human life because they permit the sharing of feelings, thoughts, ideas and information with others. Most children acquire listening and speaking skills effortlessly in the course of development. A few children, however, experience significant problems in acquiring these key communication abilities, despite seemingly normal development in other areas. These children are considered to have specific developmental disorders of speech and language and are at risk for other associated learning, emotional and behavioural disorders.

The ICD-10 designates several types of specific developmental disorders of speech and language (see Table 14.1). A key distinction central to the typology is that between speech, the complex and rapid motor movements that translate ideas into spoken words, and language, the conventional code used to understand and express ideas. The ICD-10 explicitly recognizes one type of speech disorder, specific speech articulation disorder, and three types of language disorders, expressive language disorder, receptive language disorder and acquired aphasia with epilepsy (Landau–Kleffner). Other speech and language difficulties are classified as one of two remaining types: other or unspecified. In all types, the normal acquisition of speech and/or language skills is delayed or disrupted early in infancy or childhood, while other aspects of development proceed in a relatively normal fashion. Moreover, the speech or language difficulties are not attributable to obvious sensory, structural, cognitive or neurological problems.

Type
Chapter
Information
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2006

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

References

, J. Bauman-Waengler, Articulatory and Phonological Impairments: A Clinical Focus, 2nd edn. (Needham Heights, MA: Allyn & Bacon, 2004).
, J. Beitchman, , D. Cantwell, , S. Forness, , K. Kavale & , J. Kauffman, Practice parameters for the assessment and treatment of children and adolescents with language and learning disorders. Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, 37 (10 Suppl.) (1998), 46S.Google Scholar
Beitchman, J. H., , B. Wilson, , C. J. Johnsonet al., Fourteen-year follow-up of speech/language-impaired and control children: psychiatric outcome. Journal of the American Academy of Child Adolescent Psychiatry, 40 (2001), 75.Google Scholar
, N. J. Cohen, , M. Davine, , N. Horodezky, , L. Lipsett & Isaacson, L., Unsuspected language impairment in psychiatrically disturbed children: Prevalence and language and behavioral characteristics. Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, 32 (1993), 595.Google Scholar
, H. Kolski & , H. Otsubo, The Landau–Kleffner Syndrome. Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology, 497 (2002), 195–208.Google Scholar
, J. Law, , J. Boyle, , F. Harris, , A. Harkness & , C. Nye, Prevalence and natural history of primary speech and language delay: findings from a systematic review of the literature. International Journal of Language and Communication Disorders, 35 (2000), 165.Google Scholar
, L. B. Leonard, Children with Specific Language Impairment. (Cambridge, MA: Bradford, 1998).
, J. H. Menkes & , H. B. Sarnat (eds.) Child Neurology, 6th edn. (Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 2000).
, L. Olswang, , B. Rodriguez & , G. Timler, Recommending intervention for toddlers with specific language impairment: we may not have all the answers, but we know a lot. American Journal of Speech and Language Pathology, 7 (1998), 23.Google Scholar
, R. Paul, Language Disorders from Infancy through Adolescence: Assessment and Intervention. 2nd edn. (St. Louis, MO: Mosby, 2001).
, R. O. Robinson, , G. Baird, , G. Robinson & , E. Simonoff, Landau–Kleffner syndrome: course and correlates with outcome. Developmental Medicine and Child Neurology, 43 (2001), 243.Google Scholar
, L. Shriberg & , J. Kwiatkowski, Developmental phonological disorders. I: A clinical profile. Journal of Speech, Language and Hearing Research, 37 (1994), 1100.Google Scholar
, L. Shriberg, , D. Austin, , B. Lewis, , J. McSweeny & , D. Wilson, The speech disorders classification system (SDCS): extensions and lifespan reference data. Journal of Speech, Language and Hearing Research, 40 (1997), 723.Google Scholar
, C. Toppelberg & , T. Shapiro, Language disorders: a 10-year research update review. Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, 39 (2000), 143.Google Scholar
, D. Weindrich, , Ch. Jennen-Steinmetz, , M. Laucht, , G. Esser & , M. H. Schmidt, Epidemiology and prognosis of specific disorders of language and scholastic skills. European Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, 9 (2000), 186.Google Scholar

Save book to Kindle

To save this book to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Available formats
×

Save book to Dropbox

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Available formats
×

Save book to Google Drive

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Available formats
×