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Chapter 24 - Sedation and Analgesia

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  01 June 2018

Jeffrey C. Gershel
Affiliation:
Albert Einstein College of Medicine, New York
Ellen F. Crain
Affiliation:
Albert Einstein College of Medicine, New York
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Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2018

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References

Bibliography

Bellolio, MF, Puls, HA, Anderson, JL, et al. Incidence of adverse events in paediatric procedural sedation in the emergency department: a systematic review and meta-analysis. BMJ Open. 2016;6(6):e011384.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Godwin, SA, Burton, JH, Gerardo, CJ, Hatten, BW. Clinical policy: procedural sedation and analgesia in the emergency department. Ann Emerg Med. 2014;63(2):247258.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Green, SM, Roback, MG, Kennedy, RM. Clinical practice guidelines for emergency department ketamine dissociative sedation 2011 update. Ann Emerg Med. 2011;57:462468.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Kannikeswaran, N, Lai, ML, Malian, M, Wang, B, Farooqi, A, Roback, MG. Optimal dosing of intravenous ketamine for procedural sedation in children in the ED: a randomized controlled trial. Am J Emerg Med. 2016;34:13471353.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
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Bibliography

Amsterdam, JT, Kilgore, KP. Regional anesthesia of the head and neck. In Roberts, JR, Custalow, CB, Thomsen, TW, Hedges, JR (eds.) Roberts and Hedges’ Clinical Procedures in Emergency Medicine (6th edn.). Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders, 2014; 541553.Google Scholar
McCreight, A, Stephan, M. Local and regional anesthesia. In King, C, Henretig, F (eds.) Textbook of Pediatric Emergency Procedures (2nd edn.). Philadelphia, PA: Lippincott Williams and Wilkins, 2008; 449460.Google Scholar
Spektor, M, Kelly, JJ. Nerve blocks of the thorax and extremities. In Roberts, JR, Custalow, CB, Thomsen, TW, Hedges, JR (eds.) Roberts and Hedges’ Clinical Procedures in Emergency Medicine (6th edn.). Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders, 2014; 554557, 560568, 571574.Google Scholar
Trott, AT. Wounds and Lacerations: Emergency Care and Closure (4th edn.). Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders, 2012; 4172.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Bibliography

Baxter, AL. Common office procedures and analgesia considerations. Pediatr Clin N Am. 2013;60(5):11631183.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Cramton, RE, Gruchala, NE. Managing procedural pain in pediatric patients. Curr Opin Pediatr. 2012;24(4):530538.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Krauss, BS. Video: managing procedural anxiety in children. www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/NEJMvcm1411127 (accessed May 17, 2017).
McNaughton, C, Zhou, C, Robert, L, Storrow, A, Kennedy, RM. A randomized, crossover comparison of injected buffered lidocaine, lidocaine cream, and no analgesia for peripheral intravenous cannula insertion. Ann Emerg Med. 2009;54:214220.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Zimmerman, R. When the doctor says this won’t hurt a bit – and incredibly, it’s true. http://commonhealth.legacy.wbur.org/2012/09/doctor-says-it-wont-hurt (accessed May 17, 2017).

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