Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-5c569c448b-9hjnw Total loading time: 0.45 Render date: 2022-07-06T11:40:33.769Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "useRatesEcommerce": false, "useNewApi": true } hasContentIssue true

Normal aging and neurodegenerative disorders

from Postscript: Future applications of clinical MEG

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  01 March 2010

Andrew C. Papanicolaou
Affiliation:
University of Texas
Get access

Summary

Age-dependent changes in cognition

Characterizing the neural basis of normal age-dependent changes in cognition can have important clinical implications, particularly in the case of neurodegenerative disorders where a decline in cognitive function may have prognostic value. In recent years, the application of MEG to investigate age-related changes in the profile of cognitive processing among neurologically intact individuals across the lifespan has increased. For example, a study by Kovacevic and colleagues employing the auditory oddball paradigm found that the amplitude of the early M50 component increased in elderly relative to young controls. This finding led the authors to suggest that the capacity to inhibit repetitive auditory stimuli diminishes as a function of age. Furthermore, this study also found the peak onset of the late activity evoked by rare tones, corresponding to the P300 event-related complex, also increased with age. Aine and coworkers replicated this age-dependent increase in the amplitude of the M50 component in the context of an auditory incidental verbal-learning task and noted a similar effect for later components ranging from ∼100 to ∼800 ms. These results suggested that potential age-related deficits of inhibition may also be manifest in late components related to higher cognitive functions. A subsequent study by Aine and associates further examined the effects of normal aging on cognition during the visual delayed-match-to-sample paradigm and found that although the latency and amplitude of the M100 and M300 peaks were different between young and elderly controls, they were not related to differences in behavioral performance. The authors concluded that these evoked-response components might reflect the use of different cognitive strategies by the young and elderly during episodic memory processing.

Type
Chapter
Information
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2009

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

Save book to Kindle

To save this book to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Available formats
×

Save book to Dropbox

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Available formats
×

Save book to Google Drive

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Available formats
×