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Subsection 3A - Typically Stable

from Section 3 - Trauma to Uncompromised Spine

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  28 March 2018

Zoran Rumboldt
Affiliation:
Medical University of South Carolina
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Clinical Imaging of Spinal Trauma
A Case-Based Approach
, pp. 36 - 55
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2018

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