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11 - The use of ethics consultation regarding consent and refusal

from 1 - Consent and refusal

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  05 March 2012

Gail A. Van Norman
Affiliation:
University of Washington
Stephen Jackson
Affiliation:
Good Samaritan Hospital, San Jose
Stanley H. Rosenbaum
Affiliation:
Yale University School of Medicine
Susan K. Palmer
Affiliation:
Oregon Anesthesiology Group
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Summary

This chapter presents a case study of a 63-year-old female unconscious patient involved in an MVA and brought urgently to the O.R for repair of bilateral femur fractures. With reference to this study, the chapter highlights that religious freedom does not guarantee the free practice of religious behaviors, if such behavior is harmful to others or to society. At times, conflicts between religious behavior and societal interests occur in the setting of medical care. Ethics consultation services can be useful when unusual or seemingly irresolvable conflicts between patient wishes and physician professional standards arise. An ethics consultation requires the participation of all interested parties, including the patient, patient's caregivers, family, religious support if available, the physicians, and hospital representatives. Ethics consultation includes a process of outlining the medical situation, legal considerations, ethical concerns, and a range of acceptable ethical and medical outcomes.
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Clinical Ethics in Anesthesiology
A Case-Based Textbook
, pp. 64 - 68
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2010

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