Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-888d5979f-lgdn2 Total loading time: 0.255 Render date: 2021-10-27T00:51:29.774Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": true, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true, "newUsageEvents": true }

8 - Sustainability and policy

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  17 December 2010

Get access

Summary

Having an understanding of climate change is one thing, relating this to real-world development is another. In the latter half of the twentieth century it became apparent to politicians that human impacts on the environment were sufficiently detrimental that they undermined the sustainability of human well-being and relatedly environmental quality. Human well-being is a catch-all term relating to material and cultural standards as well as quality of life.

Many of these terms, while having a clear meaning to western politicians and policy-makers, have no strict definition or individual basis of quantitative indexing in the strict scientific sense, although in some instances attempts have been made. Sustainability itself, as we shall see, does have a specific definition that is enshrined in international agreements and sustainability is affected by climate change. Consequently the history of what politicians mean by sustainability, and how current climate-change issues affect it, are central to developing climate change and human ecology from topics of academic interest to those of application.

Key developments of sustainability policy

UN Conference on the Human Environment (1972)

The 1972 Stockholm Conference on the Human Environment was the first of a series of UN conferences that arguably developed international environmental policy significantly. It was attended by 113 nations, but due to a dispute on the status of East Germany the USSR and all the Eastern European nations (many of which now are considered Central European), bar Romania, refused to participate.

Type
Chapter
Information
Climate Change
Biological and Human Aspects
, pp. 392 - 468
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2007

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

References

BP Economics Unit (1992) BP Statistical Review of World Energy. London: British Petroleum Corporate Communications Services.
BP Economics Unit (2005) BP Statistical Review of World Energy. London: British Petroleum Corporate Communications Services.
Brandt Commission (1980) North-South: a Programme for Survival. London: Pan Books.
Brandt Commission (1983) Common Crisis – North-South: Co-operation for World Recovery. London: Pan Books.
Carter, L. J. and Pigford, T. H. (2005) Proof of safety at Yucca Mountain. Science, 310, 447–8.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
CIA (2005) CIA: The World Factbook – 2005. Washington, DC: Central Intelligence Agency.
Clarke, R. and Timberlake, L. (1982) Stockholm Plus Ten: Promises, Promises? The Decade since the 1972 UN Environment Conference. London: Earthscan – International Institute for Environment and Development.Google Scholar
Climate Change Science Program (US) (2006) Temperature Trends in the Lower Atmosphere. Washington, DC: U.S. Climate Change Science Program.
Cowie, J. (1998a) Climate and Human Change: Disaster or Opportunity?London: Parthenon Publishing.Google Scholar
Cowie, J. (1998b) The other reasons for cutting carbon dioxide emissions. Science in Parliament, 55(4), 21.Google Scholar
Department of Energy (1977) Energy Policy Review – Energy Paper 22. London: Department of Energy and HMSO.
Department of Energy (1978) Energy Policy: a Consultative Document, Cmnd 7107. London: HMSO.
Department of Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (2006) Climate Change: the UK Programme. London and Norwich: DEFRA and Stationery Office.
Department of Environment, Transport and the Regions (2000) Climate Change: the UK Programme. London and Norwich: DETR and Stationery Office.
Department of Trade and Industry (2003) Review of the Feasibility of Carbon Dioxide Capture and Storage in the UK. London: DTI.
Department of Trade and Industry, Department for Transport and DEFRA (2003) Energy White Paper: Our Energy Future – Creating a Low Carbon Economy, Cmnd 5761. Norwich: Stationery Office.
Eikeland, P. O. (1993) US energy policy at a crossroads?Energy Policy, 21, 987–98.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Evans, R. D. and Herring, H. P. J. (1989) Energy Use and Energy Efficiency in the UK Domestic Sector up to the Year 2010. London: Department of Energy and HMSO.Google Scholar
Greenhalgh, G. (1990) The comforting illusion of energy conservation. Atom, 393, 6–7.Google Scholar
Hardin, G. (1968) The tragedy of the commons. Science, 162, 1243–8.Google ScholarPubMed
Hirsch, R. L. (2005) Peaking of World Oil Production: Impacts, Mitigation, & Risk Management. Washington, DC: Department of Energy.Google Scholar
HMSO (1994) Climate Change: The UK Programme, Cmnd 2427. London: HMSO.
Hulme, M., Turnpenny, J. and Jenkins, G. (2002) Climate Change Scenarios for the United Kingdom: The UKCIP02 Briefing Report. Norwich: Tyndall Centre.Google Scholar
Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (1990) Climate Change: the IPCC Scientific Assessment. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (2000) Emission Scenarios – IPCC Special Report. Geneva: WMO.
Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (2001a) Climate Change 2001: the Scientific Basis – Summary for Policymakers and Technical Summary of the Working Group I Report. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (2001b) Climate Change 2001: Impacts Adaptation and Vulnerability – a Report of Working Group II. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (2005) IPCC Special Report on Carbon Dioxide Capture and Storage. IPCC, Geneva.
International Energy Agency (2005) World Energy Outlook 2005. Paris: IEA.
International Energy Agency (2006) China's Power Sector Reforms: Where Next? Paris: IEA.
International Energy Authority (2004) Key World Energy Statistics. Paris: IEA.
International Union for the Conservation of Nature, World Wildlife Fund and United Nations Environment Programme (1980) The World Conservation Strategy. Gland, Switzerland: IUCN.
International Union for the Conservation of Nature, World Wildlife Fund and United Nations Environment Programme (1991) Caring for the Earth: a Strategy for Sustainable Living. London: Earthscan.
Kabat, P., Vellinga, P., Vierssen, W., Veraat, J. and Aerts, J. (2005) Climate proofing the Netherlands, Nature, 438, 283–4.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Kerr, R. A. (2005) Bumpy road ahead for World's oil. Science, 310, 1106–8.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Kintisch, E. (2005) US Energy Bill promises some boosts for research. Science, 309, 863.Google Scholar
MalthusT. R. (1798) Essay on the Principle of Population as it Affects the Future Improvement of Society With Remarks on the Speculation of Mr Godwin, Mr Condorcet and Other Writers. Reprinted in On Population (1960) (Himmelfarb, G., ed.). New York: Modern Library.Google Scholar
McMichael, A. J. (2005) Environmental and social influences on emerging infectious diseases: past, present and future. In McLean, A. R., May, R. M., Pattison, J. and Weiss, R. A., eds, SARS: a Case Study in Emerging Infections.Oxford: Oxford University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Meadows, D. H., Meadows, D. L., Randers, J. and Behrens, W. W. III (1972) The Limits to Growth. London: Pan Books.Google Scholar
Meadows, D. H., Meadows, D. L. and Randers, J. (1992) Beyond the Limits: Global Collapse or a Sustainable Future. Godalming and London: World Wide Fund For Nature and Earthscan.Google Scholar
National Energy Policy Development Group (2001) National Energy Policy. Washington, DC: National Energy Policy Development Group.
Office of the Deputy Prime Minister (2005) Proposals for Introducing a Code for Sustainable Homes. London: Office of the Deputy Prime Minister.
Parliamentary Office of Science and Technology (2005) Household Energy Efficiency, POST Note 249. www.parliament.uk/parliamentary_offices/post/pubs2005.cfm.
Rose, D. J. (1974) Energy policy in the US. Scientific American, 230, 20–9. Reprinted in Energy and Environment: Readings from Scientific America (1980) (Siever, R., ed.). San Francisco: Freeman & Co.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Royal Society of Chemistry (2005) Chemical Science Priorities for Sustainable Energy Solutions. London: Royal Society of Chemistry.
Schipper, L. and Hawk, D. V. (1991) More efficient household electricity use. Energy Policy, 19(3), 244–62.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Seiver, R. (1980) Energy and Environment: Readings from the Scientific American – Energy Policy in the US. San Francisco: Freeman & Co.Google Scholar
Stern, N. (2007) Economics of Climate Change: the Stern Review. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Tyme, J. (1978) Motorways Versus Democracy. London: Macmillan Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
UN Population Division of the Department of Economic and Social Affairs (2002) World Population Prospects: The 2002 Revision. New York: United Nations Secretariat.
Wilson, E. O. (1988) Biodiversity. Harvard, CT: Harvard University Press.Google Scholar
World Commission on Environment and Development (1987) Our Common Future. Oxford: Oxford University Press.
Worldwatch Institute (2003) Vital Signs: 2003–2004, London: Earthscan.

Send book to Kindle

To send this book to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Available formats
×

Send book to Dropbox

To send content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Available formats
×

Send book to Google Drive

To send content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Available formats
×