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Conclusions

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  05 June 2012

Peter Newell
Affiliation:
University of East Anglia
Matthew Paterson
Affiliation:
University of Ottawa
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Summary

REALITY CHECK

What if these transformations fail? If you have bought this book and are reading this now, chances are you are concerned about climate change. But we have managed to write a book about climate change while hardly mentioning it as a physical phenomenon – of higher temperatures, sea-level rise, changed rainfall and the social disruptions those changes bring. One of the ironies of carbon markets, though, is that you don't really have to care about climate change to contribute towards tackling the issue. The market, in theory at least, allows you do it while making money.

It is worth reminding ourselves, however, that the costs of not decarbonising the global economy are that life for many on the planet will be, in the classic words of seventeenth-century political philosopher Thomas Hobbes, ‘solitary, poor, nasty, brutish and short’. As Kevin Watkins, speaking as editor of the 2008 UN Human Development Report on climate change and development, reflects: ‘It is about social justice and the human rights of the world's poor and marginalised. Failure to act on climate change would be tantamount to a systematic violation of the human rights of the poor.’ For this reason, President Museveni of Uganda described climate change as ‘an act of aggression by the rich against the poor’. Hundreds of millions are expected to be made homeless by sea-level rise and droughts as rainfall patterns change.

Type
Chapter
Information
Climate Capitalism
Global Warming and the Transformation of the Global Economy
, pp. 182 - 188
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2010

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References

Newell, P., ‘Fit for purpose: Towards a development architecture that can deliver’ in Paluso, E. (ed.) Re-thinking Development in a Carbon-Constrained World: Development Cooperation and Climate Change (Finland: Ministry of Foreign Affairs, 2009), pp. 184–196.Google Scholar
,World Bank, International Trade and Climate Change: Economic, Legal and Institutional Perspectives (Washington D.C: World Bank, 2007)Google Scholar

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  • Conclusions
  • Peter Newell, University of East Anglia, Matthew Paterson, University of Ottawa
  • Book: Climate Capitalism
  • Online publication: 05 June 2012
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511761850.012
Available formats
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  • Conclusions
  • Peter Newell, University of East Anglia, Matthew Paterson, University of Ottawa
  • Book: Climate Capitalism
  • Online publication: 05 June 2012
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511761850.012
Available formats
×

Send book to Google Drive

To send content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

  • Conclusions
  • Peter Newell, University of East Anglia, Matthew Paterson, University of Ottawa
  • Book: Climate Capitalism
  • Online publication: 05 June 2012
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511761850.012
Available formats
×