Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Hostname: page-component-77c89778f8-9q27g Total loading time: 0 Render date: 2024-07-19T12:39:42.507Z Has data issue: false hasContentIssue false

6 - ‘The Coming Man and Woman’

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  12 September 2012

Sydney Janet Kaplan
Affiliation:
University of Washington
Get access

Summary

‘You are evidently a genius as an editor – nothing short of that – a perfect genius’, Mansfield tells Murry on 13 October 1919, after reading through a particularly lively issue of the Athenaeum (KMCL 3: 21). Murry is equally complimentary in his response to her letter on 17 October, exclaiming that she is ‘the only genius in the whole bunch of good ones among us’ (LJMM: 187). He also magnanimously suggests she help Lawrence by writing something on Sons and Lovers, ‘saying how it stands out etc. You know what the average is like nowadays & you can speak your mind’ (LJMM: 188). In this optimistic mood, he lays out his plans for her to consider: ‘I have two determinations – one to make the paper a success against all competition this winter – the other to write a novel with among other things some real you and me love in it’. As editor, Murry is now able to control the direction of his own literary criticism without interference. He can select the books he wants to review and use them for his own purposes, especially as vehicles for his developing aesthetic principles. In fact, the Athenaeum provides the opportunity for both Murry and Mansfield to cultivate their critical talents and to articulate the theoretical bases for their critical practices. Mansfield's ‘novel page’, as Murry calls it, is ‘one of the features most appreciated in the paper’, and he believes that it is ‘quite unlike – in a different class to – anything that's being done in the way of reviewing anywhere to-day’ (LJMM: 210).

Type
Chapter
Information
Circulating Genius
John Middleton Murry Katherine Mansfield and D. H. Lawrence
, pp. 118 - 136
Publisher: Edinburgh University Press
Print publication year: 2010

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

Save book to Kindle

To save this book to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Available formats
×

Save book to Dropbox

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Available formats
×

Save book to Google Drive

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Available formats
×