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Bibliography

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  28 September 2018

Kirk Melnikoff
Affiliation:
University of North Carolina, Charlotte
Roslyn L. Knutson
Affiliation:
University of Arkansas
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Print publication year: 2018

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