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Part III - Applied Topics in Law and Conscience

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  12 June 2021

Jeffrey B. Hammond
Affiliation:
Faulkner University
Helen M. Alvare
Affiliation:
George Mason University, Virginia
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Christianity and the Laws of Conscience
An Introduction
, pp. 285 - 434
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2021

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