Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Hostname: page-component-77c89778f8-9q27g Total loading time: 0 Render date: 2024-07-16T16:52:45.787Z Has data issue: false hasContentIssue false

8 - Ius gentium et naturae: The Human Conscience and Early Modern International Law

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  17 May 2021

Pamela Slotte
Affiliation:
Åbo Akademi University
John D. Haskell
Affiliation:
University of Manchester
Get access

Summary

What to focus on in an intellectual history of ius gentium et naturae for a volume on the relations between international law and Christianities? For centuries, (international) law and Christian theology maintained intensive and complex relations, which it is impossible to do justice to within the scope of this chapter. With the more recent “turn to history” in international legal scholarship, discussions of the relationship between ius gentium et naturae and Christianity generally center on secularization and/or empire. For obvious reasons both sets of histories deal with early modernity – the time that the so-called Respublica Christiana or Holy Roman Empire was profoundly affected by Reformations, gradually fragmented, and religious and theological fights were part of the politics of the newly emerging European nation-states.

Type
Chapter
Information
Christianity and International Law
An Introduction
, pp. 153 - 176
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2021

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

References

Recommended Reading

Koskenniemi, Martti, García-Salmones Rovira, Mónica, and Amorosa, Paolo, eds. International Law and Religion: Historical and Contemporary Perspectives. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2017.Google Scholar
Neff, Stephen C. Justice among Nations: A History of International Law. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 2014.Google Scholar
Stumpf, Christoph A. The Grotian Theology of International Law: Hugo Grotius and the Moral Foundations of International Relations. Berlin: Walter de Gruyter, 2006.Google Scholar
Tierney, Brian. The Idea of Natural Rights: Studies on Natural Rights, Natural Law and Church Law. Grand Rapids, MI: Wm. B. Eerdmans Publishing, 1997.Google Scholar
Witte, John, Jr. The Reformation of Rights: Law, Religion, and Human Rights in Early Modern Calvinism. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2007.Google Scholar

Save book to Kindle

To save this book to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Available formats
×

Save book to Dropbox

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Available formats
×

Save book to Google Drive

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Available formats
×