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18 - Hopelessly Practicing Law: Asylum Seekers, Advocates, and Hostile Jurisdictions

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  17 May 2021

Pamela Slotte
Affiliation:
Åbo Akademi University
John D. Haskell
Affiliation:
University of Manchester
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Summary

What does it mean to practice public international law? This is a frequent topic of conversation for many of us who work with law students inspired to study the law and pursue legal vocations in the belief that peace, justice, and human rights may be best advanced through the international legal framework. But, as our students often discover, that framework can be deeply frustrating. From its heavily bureaucratic structure anchored in the United Nations (UN) system, to the unresolved tension between individuals and states as actors in and beneficiaries of international law, public international law can often seem as much an obstacle as a means to our virtue.

This chapter examines the ethic of praxis in public international law by examining an often-overlooked area of international legal practice: refugee and asylum law. An ethic of praxis, as I discuss it in this chapter, is an ethic with attention to creatureliness, which is to say finitude.

Type
Chapter
Information
Christianity and International Law
An Introduction
, pp. 395 - 414
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2021

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References

Recommended Reading

Betts, Alexander. Survival Migration: Failed Governance and the Crisis of Displacement. Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 2013.
De La Torre, Miguel A. Embracing Hopelessness. Minneapolis: Fortress Press, 2017.
Gatrell, Peter. The Making of the Modern Refugee. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2013.
Goodwin-Gill, Guy S., and McAdam., Jane The Refugee in International Law. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2007.
Snyder, Susanna. Asylum-Seeking, Migration and Church. Burlington, VT: Ashgate, 2012.

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