Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-55597f9d44-pgkvd Total loading time: 0.218 Render date: 2022-08-10T06:47:35.308Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "useRatesEcommerce": false, "useNewApi": true } hasContentIssue true

4 - Can the Internet Help? How Immigrant Women from China Get Jobs: A Survey on PRC Immigrants’ Employment Status in Canada

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  26 January 2021

Get access

Summary

Introduction

This chapter studies how the Internet can ease access to skilled jobs for Chinese women immigrants in Canada and where it fails. Labour markets develop mechanisms that segment the working populace into those who are seen as more and less worthy of the good jobs. Gender and the attribution of who are indigenous or intruders are key divisions between contenders for prime positions. In North America, entrenched divisions between women and men, immigrants and locals, are accompanied by definitions of who possess the required characteristics for job holders. With the pay, prestige, and culture of jobs differing, good jobs are contested by means of definitions of who is worthy. Institutional theory conjectures that these rationales are socially constructed, shared beliefs that are not questioned. Newcomers on the block, especially women immigrants, fail to get good jobs because they fit poorly into the institutional environment. They do not have the power to cross the boundaries into the desirable jobs.

A number of writers posit how the Internet can break through the institutional allocation of gender roles and work roles. Post modernist theory claims that through the need for new information, the knowledge society flattens traditional hierarchies and rigid subjectivities underlying gendered and racialized jobs and restructures the institutional order (Bell 1973; Castells 1996; Webster 2005). Some writers posit that the Internet builds networks and can create new forms of useful contacts, or social capital. They contend that most immigrants lack information about the new country and they do not have much social capital. Caidi and Allard (2005) maintain that access to the Internet can help them build social networks. However, there are indications that the Internet does not change the old order (Gamba & Kleiner 2001) and most of the so-called networking websites build their connections on existing social relations so that immigrants will face the same problems on the Internet that they face in real life. Most networks form around similar others (Ibarra 1992; McPherson et al. 2001). We argue that the Internet affects social structures indirectly by enabling job seekers to apply in ways that minimize control of gatekeepers. Gatekeepers to jobs are part of the gendered and racialized segmented labour force, and we posit that the Internet can help reduce the gate keeping effects through randomness in screening from large numbers of applicants.

Type
Chapter
Information
Publisher: Amsterdam University Press
Print publication year: 2008

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

Save book to Kindle

To save this book to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Available formats
×

Save book to Dropbox

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Available formats
×

Save book to Google Drive

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Available formats
×