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3 - The Age of Mass Migration, 1840–1937

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  31 January 2020

Steven B. Miles
Affiliation:
Washington University, St Louis
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Summary

Chapter 3 surveys the vast expansion, both in the numbers of migrants and in the range of destinations, of Chinese migration during the age of mass migration, processes driven in part by industrialization and imperialism. The chapter both traces the expansion of existing diasporic trajectories, such as migration from Shandong to Manchuria and the Hokkien diaspora in Southeast Asia, and introduces new diasporic trajectories, such as the Teochiu migrants to Thailand, Cantonese migrants to Australasia and the Americas, and Zhejiang migrants to Europe. The chapter also draws attention to diasporic trajectories made up of female migrants, to Shanghai and Singapore, representing the beginnings of the feminization of migration. The chapter then introduces institutions unique to the age of mass migration: treaty ports, indentured servitude and the “coolie” trade. The chapter argues that while the age of migration was the heyday of such Chinese institutions as native-place associations and brotherhoods, it also witnessed the emergence of new types of migration services. The chapter concludes with a third example of a Chinese diasporic community, this one made up of Teochiu farmers in a village on the Malay Peninsula.

Type
Chapter
Information
Chinese Diasporas
A Social History of Global Migration
, pp. 90 - 135
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2020

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References

For Further Exploration

Chang, Gordon H. and Fishkin, Shelley Fisher, eds. The Chinese and the Iron Road: Building the Transcontinental Railroad. Stanford University Press, 2019.
Chen, Yong. Chinese San Francisco, 1850–1943: A Trans-Pacific Community. Stanford University Press, 2000.
Cushman, Jennifer Wayne. Family and State: The Formation of a Sino-Thai Tin-Mining Dynasty. Oxford University Press, 1991.
Gottschang, Thomas R. and Lary, Diana. Swallows and Settlers: The Great Migration from North China to Manchuria. Center for Chinese Studies, The University of Michigan, 2000.
Honig, Emily. Sisters and Strangers: Women in the Shanghai Cotton Mills, 1919–1949. Stanford University Press, 1986.
Hsu, Madeline Y. Dreaming of Gold, Dreaming of Home: Transnationalism and Migration between the United States and South China, 1882–1943. Stanford University Press, 2000.
Li, Yi. Chinese in Colonial Burma: A Migrant Community in a Multiethnic State. Palgrave Macmillan, 2017.
McKeown, Adam. “Global Migration, 1846–1940.Journal of World History 15.2 (2004): 155189.
Shen, Huifen. China’s Left-Behind Wives: Families of Migrants from Fujian to Southeast Asia, 1930s–1950s. University of Hawai’i Press, 2012.
Sinn, Elizabeth. Pacific Crossing: California Gold, Chinese Migration, and the Making of Hong Kong. HKU Press, 2013.
Szonyi, Michael. “Mothers, Sons and Lovers: Fidelity and Frugality in the Overseas Chinese Divided Family before 1949.” Journal of Chinese Overseas 1.1 (May 2005): 4364.
Wilson, Andrew R. Ambition and Identity: Chinese Merchant Elites in Colonial Manila, 1880–1916. University of Hawai’i Press, 2004.
Yen, Ching-hwang. A Social History of the Chinese in Singapore and Malaya, 1800–1911. Oxford University Press, 1986.

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