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Chapter 14 - Airway management ofthe pregnant patient

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  05 December 2015

Lauren C. Berkow
Affiliation:
The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine
John C. Sakles
Affiliation:
University of Arizona College of Medicine
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Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2015

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References

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