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Case 15 - Young man with progressive speech impairment and weakness

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  16 May 2011

Serge Gauthier
Affiliation:
McGill University, Montréal
Pedro Rosa-Neto
Affiliation:
McGill University, Montréal
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Summary

This chapter talks about a 54-year-old right-handed man who was brought to medical attention by his daughter because of progressive speech difficulty over the last 2 years. The patient was clinically diagnosed with fronto-temporal dementia with non-fluent progressive aphasia as well as behavioral symptoms. Sensory and motor nerve conduction studies were normal. EMG needle electromyography showed mixed denervation pattern in the right FDI and left biceps with 2_ fasciculation potentials, positive sharp waves, and fibrillations. Motor units were polyphasic with increase in sharp waves. External examination of the formalin-fixed brain showed no obvious cerebral atrophy or no focal lesions. The base of the brain was unremarkable apart from mild patchy atherosclerosis. Serial coronal sections through the cerebral hemispheres showed a normal ventricular system and deep gray structures. Sections of the brainstem and cerebellum were also unremarkable apart from mild loss of pigmentation of substantia nigra.
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Case Studies in Dementia
Common and Uncommon Presentations
, pp. 105 - 114
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2011

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