Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-55597f9d44-rn2sj Total loading time: 0.817 Render date: 2022-08-14T19:09:51.602Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "useRatesEcommerce": false, "useNewApi": true } hasContentIssue true

Book contents

Case 17 - Woman with complaints about her left arm

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  16 May 2011

Serge Gauthier
Affiliation:
McGill University, Montréal
Pedro Rosa-Neto
Affiliation:
McGill University, Montréal
Get access

Summary

This chapter talks about a 62-year-old right-handed lady who consulted her family doctor when she noticed that she was unable to use her knitting needle properly with her left hand. The provisional diagnosis was Corticobasal Syndrome (CBS) based on the combination of subtle asymmetric extrapyramidal findings and prominent apraxia. CBS is an akinetic-rigid clinical syndrome characterized by lateralized motor and cognitive signs, such as rigidity, dystonia, spontaneous or stimulus-sensitive myoclonus, apraxia, alien limb phenomenon, cortical sensory loss, and aphasia. This clinical syndrome has been associated with many pathological entities other than CBD, including Progressive Supranuclear Palsy (PSP), Alzheimer's disease, Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, and many diseases in the spectrum of Frontotemporal Lobar Degeneration (FTLD): Pick's disease, Frontotemporal Dementia (FTD) with ubiquitin-positive inclusions, FTD due to mutations of MAPT and PGRN. Ante-mortem diagnosis can be difficult because proposed criteria lack sensitivity and specificity.
Type
Chapter
Information
Case Studies in Dementia
Common and Uncommon Presentations
, pp. 124 - 131
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2011

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

Save book to Kindle

To save this book to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Available formats
×

Save book to Dropbox

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Available formats
×

Save book to Google Drive

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Available formats
×