Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-59b7f5684b-z9m8x Total loading time: 0.33 Render date: 2022-09-26T06:46:26.539Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "useRatesEcommerce": false, "displayNetworkTab": true, "displayNetworkMapGraph": false, "useSa": true } hasContentIssue true

6 - Managerialism as a failing response to the care crisis

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  13 May 2022

Lise Lotte Hansen
Affiliation:
Roskilde Universitet, Denmark
Hanne Marlene Dahl
Affiliation:
The University of Chicago
Laura Horn
Affiliation:
Roskilde Universitet, Denmark
Get access

Summary

Introduction

For several decades now, elder care services have been characterised by recurring crises in Finland. In 2006, a political scandal erupted when allegations became public of insufficient staff ratios in Koukkuniemi, the largest unit of institutional care for older adults in the Nordic countries at the time (Yle, 2006). In 2019, a scandal broke when the National Supervisory Authority for Welfare and Health (Valvira) ordered the closure of several care homes owned by private care companies due to severe neglect in the quality of care, and announced that they were investigating several complaints regarding deficiencies in elder care (Valvira, 2019). Valvira's lawyer described the situation in the first care home as an ‘acute crisis’, which is why it was closed down immediately (Tiessalo, 2019). The situation was described as a ‘care crisis’ by the media, expert commentators and opposition politicians as well as the Regional State Administrative Agencies (AVI, 2020).

Care crisis is understood here as referring to a situation in elder care that has reached a critical phase in relation to the quality of care, also involving public concerns over the quality and conditions of care work. While a crisis is commonly understood as a temporary disruption, for many people in the world, such as older adults in poor health, a crisis can become a lasting, endemic condition. Nevertheless, when a crisis has been identified by central actors in the field, action needs to be taken.

In Finland, a common line of action is routinely suggested as a solution to the crisis of elder care: improvements in the management of care. When developments and outcomes in elder care turn into a media frenzy and draw public attention to deficiencies and problems of all kinds from individual neglect and abuse to systematic understaffing, poor working conditions and widespread inadequate and inhumane treatment, at some point, the quality of management is identified as a key factor causing the strife, and hence better management is proposed as a solution to the crisis (for example Räsänen, 2011; Hoppania, 2015; Hoppania et al, 2017). However, very little public debate has emerged about what (good-quality) care management actually entails.

Type
Chapter
Information
A Care Crisis in the Nordic Welfare States?
Care Work, Gender Equality and Welfare State Sustainability
, pp. 100 - 119
Publisher: Bristol University Press
Print publication year: 2021

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

Save book to Kindle

To save this book to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Available formats
×

Save book to Dropbox

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Available formats
×

Save book to Google Drive

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Available formats
×