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22 - Civil Rights and Indigenous People

from V - Social Organisation

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  04 August 2022

Peter Cane
Affiliation:
University of Cambridge
Lisa Ford
Affiliation:
University of New South Wales, Sydney
Mark McMillan
Affiliation:
RMIT University, Melbourne
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Summary

Indigenous people have been subject to racialised legislation and practice across all jurisdictions in Australia. This chapter characterises the fight against these as the Aboriginal civil rights movement. We trace key moments is this history, looking at the connections and movement building undertaken by different Indigenous people and organisations. Starting in 1927 with the founding of Australian Aboriginal Progressive Association (AAPA), the other significant political resistance we look at are - 1938 Day of Mourning, 1956 founding of the Australian-Aboriginal Fellowship (AAF), 1958 the Federal Council for Aboriginal Advancement (FCAA), the 1965 Freedom Rides, and the 1967 Referendum. We end by turning to the 1970s Black Power movement and the new ways Aboriginal people undertook social change battles.

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Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2022

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