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1 - Ancient World Literature

from Part I - Genealogies

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  17 August 2021

Debjani Ganguly
Affiliation:
University of Virginia
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Summary

Though world literature is often considered a modern phenomenon, a range of world literatures developed in cosmopolitan cultures in antiquity, as was already recognized by the early comparatist Hutcheson Macaulay Posnett. This essay discusses examples of world literature created in the Hellenistic and imperial Roman world and the ancient Near East, looking in particular at relations between imperial centers and colonial peripheries.

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Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2021

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