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2 - Cultural Transmission and the Early French Novel

from Part I - Beginnings: From the Late Medieval to Madame de Lafayette

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  04 February 2021

Adam Watt
Affiliation:
University of Exeter
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Summary

Whereas much scholarship on the history of the novel focuses on its relationship to large narrative forms such as epic or romance, this chapter argues that the novella tradition plays a central role in the development of the novelistic world. We show how intercalated novellas, translated or adapted from Italian or Spanish, inflect the emergence of the French novelistic canon, functioning as sites at which cultural difference is explored and managed. Material from the novella tradition helps shape and define the notions of national character and identity, as well as the role of a national language, in the emerging French canon. The chapter moves from the history of translation and editing, through a discussion of Scarron and Mme de Lafayette, to a study of the politics of genre.

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Chapter
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Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2021

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References

Further Reading

Bakhtin, Mikhail, The Dialogic Imagination: Four Essays, trans. and ed. by Emerson, Caryl and Holquist, Michael (Austin: University of Texas Press, 1981)Google Scholar
Ballard, Michel and Lieven, d’Hulst (eds.), La Traduction en France à l’âge classique (Villeneuve d’Ascq: Presses Universitaires du Septentrion, 1996)Google Scholar
Bistué, Belén, Collaborative Translation and Multi-Version Texts in Early Modern Europe: Transculturalisms, 1400–1700 (Farnham, Surrey, and Burlington, VT: Ashgate, 2013)Google Scholar
Chevrel, Yves, Cointre, Annie and Tran-Gervat, Yen-Maï (eds.), Histoire des traductions en langue française: XVIIe et XVIIIe siècles (1610–1815) (Lagrasse: Verdier, 2014).Google Scholar
Coldiron, Anne E. B., Printers without Borders: Translation and Textuality in the Renaissance (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2015)Google Scholar
DeJean, , Joan, , Tender Geographies: Women and the Origins of the Novel in France (Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, 1991)Google Scholar
Doody, Margaret Anne, The True Story of the Novel (New Brunswick: Rutgers University Press, 1997)Google Scholar
Fernández, José María Pére, and Wilson-Lee, Edward (eds.), Translation and the Book Trade in Early Modern Europe (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2014)Google Scholar
Glomski, Jacqueline and Moreau, Isabelle (eds.), Seventeenth-Century Fiction: Text and Transmission (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2016)Google Scholar
Jolles, André, Les Formes Simples (Paris: Seuil, 1972)Google Scholar
Lestringant, Frank and Zink, Michel (eds.), Histoire de la France littéraire, vol. i (Paris: Presses Universitaires de France, 2006)Google Scholar
Moretti, Franco (ed.), The Novel, 2 vols. (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2007)Google Scholar
Norton, Glyn P., The Ideology and Language of Translation in Renaissance France and Their Humanist Antecedents (Geneva: Librairie Droz, 1984)Google Scholar
Paige, Nicholas, Before Fiction: The Ancien Régime of the Novel (Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 2011)Google Scholar
Venuti, Lawrence, The Translator’s Invisibility: A History of Translation (London: Routledge, 1995)Google Scholar

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