Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-55597f9d44-pgkvd Total loading time: 0.588 Render date: 2022-08-09T18:32:26.013Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "useRatesEcommerce": false, "useNewApi": true } hasContentIssue true

9 - The Southeast Frontiers of Mesoamerica

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  28 March 2008

Richard E. W. Adams
Affiliation:
University of Texas Health Science Center, San Antonio
Murdo J. MacLeod
Affiliation:
University of Florida
Get access

Summary

INTRODUCTION

Although the scholarly investigations of Classic Maya civilization in the lowlands of Guatemala and Yucatan began more than a century ago, similar work in the southeastern Mesoamerican frontier of El Salvador and Honduras began only three or four decades ago. The serious investigation of the social dynamics of intersocietal contact in prehistory began in the past two decades. Although data are not ample for El Salvador and Honduras, they are sufficient to consider the countries as a frontier in prehistory, and explore how that frontier changed. Many theoretical models have been employed, including diffusion, acculturation, conquest, religion, trade, emulation, interaction spheres, frontiers and boundaries, dependency theory, and world system approaches among others.

The frontier model is emphasized in this chapter. Although it is in common usage, I try to avoid the term periphery because of its pejorative connotations. Viewing the area as peripheral to Mesoamerica or the Maya tends to discount autochthonous achievements. Scholars in southeastern Mesoamerica are beginning to separate indigenous traditions in architecture, artifacts, settlement patterns, and society from the effects of external groups. The use of the plural in the title is deliberate, as there are different kinds of frontiers (e.g., political, economic, ethnic, and religious), and frontiers change their location and nature through time.

Type
Chapter
Information
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2000

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

References

Abel-Vidor, Suzanne. 1981. “Ethnohistorical Approaches to the Archaeology of Greater Nicoya.” In Between Continents/Between Seas: Precolumbian Art of Costa Rica, ed. Abel-Vidor, Suzanne et al.. Abrams, New York.Google Scholar
Andrews V, E. Wyllys. 1976. The Archaeology of Quelepa, El Salvador. Middle American Research Institute Publication 42, Tulane University, New Orleans.
Baudez, Claude, and Becquelin, Pierre. 1973. Archeologie de Los Naranjos, Honduras. Collection Etudes Mesoamericaines 2. Mission Archeologique et Ethnologique, Mexico.
Baudez, Claude. 1970. Central America. Nagel Publishers, Geneva.
Baudez, Claude. 1976. “Arqueologia de la frontera sur de Mesoamerica.” 14th Mesa Redonda, Sociedad Mexicana de Antropologia 1.Google Scholar
Black, Kevin. 1983. “The Zapotitan Valley Archeological Survey.” In Archeology and Volcanism in Central America: The Zapotitan Valley of El Salvador, ed. Sheets, Payson. University of Texas Press, Austin.Google Scholar
Bove, Frederick. 1989. “Dedicated to the Costenos: Introduction and New Insights.” In New Frontiers in the Archaeology of the Pacific Coast of Southern Mesoamerica, ed. Bove, Frederick and Heller, Lynette. Anthropological Research Paper 39, Arizona State University, Tempe.Google Scholar
Bullen, Ripley and Plowden, William. 1963. “Preceramic Archaic Sites in the Highlands of Honduras.” American Antiquity 28.Google Scholar
Caldwell, Joseph. 1964. “Interaction Spheres in Prehistory.” In Hopewellian Studies, ed. Caldwell, J. and Hall, R.. Illinois State Museum Scientific Papers 12. Springfield.Google Scholar
Cobean, Robert, Michael, Coe, Perry, Edward, Turekian, Karl, and Kharkar, Dinkar. 1971. “Obsidian Trade at San Lorenzo Tenochtitlan, Mexico.” Science 174.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Coe, Michael and Flannery, Kent. 1967. Early Cultures and Human Ecology in South Coastal Guatemala. Smithsonian Contributions to Anthropology, vol. 3. Washington, DC.
Demarest, Arthur. 1986. The Archaeology of Santa Leticia and the Rise of Maya Civilization. Middle American Research Institute Publication 52, Tulane University, New Orleans.
Demarest, Arthur. 1988. “Political Evolution in tiie Maya Borderlands: The Salvadoran Frontier.” In The Southeast Classic Maya Zone, ed. Boone, Elizabeth and Willey, Gordon. Dumbarton Oaks, Washington, DC.Google Scholar
Dillon, Brian D. 1987. “The Highland-Lowland Maya Frontier: Archaeological Evidence from Alta Verapaz, Guatemala.” In The Periphery of the Southeastern Classic Maya Realm, ed. Pahl, Gary W.. UCLA Latin American Center Publications, Los Angeles.Google Scholar
Dixon, Boyd. 1987. “Conflict along the Southeast Mesoamerican Periphery: A Defensive Wall System at the site of Tenampua.” In Interaction on the Southeast Mesoamerican Frontier, ed. Robinson, Eugenia. BAR International Series 327.Google Scholar
Earnest, Howard, and Demarest, Arthur. 1987. “The Southern Frontier as a Cultural Boundary: Differential Rates of Change in Central and Western El Salvador.” In Interaction on the Southeast Mesoamerican Frontier, ed. Robinson, Eugenia. BAR International Series 327.Google Scholar
Fash, William. 1991. Scribes, Warriors and Kings: The City of Copan and the Ancient Maya. New York.
Fowler, William, and Earnest, Howard Jr 1985. “Settlement Patterns and Prehistory of the Paraiso Basin of El Salvador.” Journal of Field Archaeology 12.Google Scholar
Fowler, William. 1989. The Cultural Evolution of Ancient Nahua Civilizations: The Pipil-Nicarao of Central America. University of Oklahoma Press, Norman.
Gerstle, Andrea. 1987. “Ethnic Diversity and Interaction at Copán, Honduras.” In Interaction on the Southeast Mesoamerican Frontier, ed. Robinson, Eugenia. BAR International Series 327.Google Scholar
Healy, Paul. 1984. “The Archaeology of Honduras” In The Archaeology of Lower Central America, ed. Lange, F. and Stone, D.. University of New Mexico Press, Albuquerque.Google Scholar
Henderson, John, Sterns, Ilene, Wonderley, Anthony, and Urban, Patricia. 1979. “Archaeological Investigations in the Valle de Naco, Northwestern Honduras.” Journal of Field Archaeology 6.Google Scholar
Henderson, John. 1977. “The Valley de Naco: Ethnohistory and Archaeology in Northwestern Honduras.” Ethnohistory 24.Google Scholar
Henderson, John. 1981. The World of the Ancient Maya. Cornell University Press, Ithaca, NY.
Henderson, John. 1989. “Current Research: Mesoamerica.” American Antiquity 54.Google Scholar
Joesink-Mandeville, Leroy. 1987. “Yarumela, Honduras: Formative Period Cultural Conservatism and Diffusion.” In Interaction on the Southeast Mesoamerican Frontier, ed. Robinson, Eugenia. BAR International Series 327.Google Scholar
Joyce, Rosemary. 1987. “Intraregional Ceramic Variation and Social Class: Developmental Trajectories of Classic Period Ceramic Complexes from the Ulua Valley.” In Interaction on the Southeast Mesoamerican Frontier, ed. Robinson, Eugenia. BAR International Series 327.Google Scholar
Kelley, Jane. 1988. Cihuatan, El Salvador: A Study in Intrasite Variability. Vanderbilt University Publications in Anthropology, No. 35. Nashville, TN.
Kennedy, Nedenia. 1980. “Formative Ceramic Chronology from Playa de los Muertos, Honduras.” Paper presented at a meeting of the Society for American Archaeology, Philadelphia.Google Scholar
Kroeber, Alfred. 1948. Anthropology. Harcourt Brace, New York.
Lange, Frederick. 1976. “Theoretical and Descriptive Aspects of Frontier StudiesLatin American Research Review 14.Google Scholar
Lange, Frederick. 1986. “Central America and the Southwest: A Comparison of Mesoamerica’s Two Peripheries.” In Research and Reflections in Archaeology and History: Essays in Honor of Doris Stone, ed. Andrews, E. Wyllys V. Middle American Research Institute Publication 57, Tulane University, New Orleans.Google Scholar
Linares, Olga, Sheets, Payson, and Rosenthal, Jane. 1975. “Prehistoric Agriculture in Tropical Highlands.” Science 187.Google Scholar
Linares, Olga. 1979. “What is Lower Central American Archaeology?Annual Review of Anthropology 8. Annual Reviews, Palo Alto, CA.Google Scholar
Longyear, John III. 1944. Archaeological Investigations in El Salvador. Memoirs, 9:. Peabody Museum, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA.
Longyear, John III. 1948. “A sub-pottery deposit at Copan, Honduras. American Antiquity 13.Google Scholar
Lothrop, Samuel. 1926 Pottery of Costa Rica and Nicaragua. Vol. 2. Contributions from the Museum of the American Indian. Heye Foundation, New York.
Marcus, Joyce. 1989. “Preface.” In New Frontiers in the Archaeology of the Pacific Coast of Southern Mesoamerica, ed. Bove, Frederick and Heller, Lynette. Anthropological Research Paper 39, Arizona State University.Google Scholar
Renfrew, Colin. 1975. “Trade as action at a Distance.” In Ancient Civilization and Trade, ed. Sabloff, J. and Lamberg-Karlovsky, C.. University of New Mexico Press, Albuquerque.Google Scholar
Schortman, Edward and Urban, Patricia. 1987. “Survey within the Gualjoquito Hinterland: An Introduction to the Investigations of the Santa Barbara Archaeological Project.” In Interaction on the Southeast Mesoamerican Frontier, ed. Robinson, Eugenia. BAR International Series 327.Google Scholar
Schortman, Edward. 1986. “Interaction between the Maya and Non-Maya along the Late Classic Southeast Maya Periphery: The View from the Lower Motagua Valley, Guatemala” In The Southeast Maya Periphery, ed. Urban, Patricia and Schortman, Edward. University of Texas Press, Austin.Google Scholar
Sharer, Robert, ed. 1978. The Prehistory of Chalchuapa, El Salvador. University of Pennsylvania Press, Philadelphia.
Sharer, Robert. 1974. “The Prehistory of the Southeast Maya Periphery.” Current Anthropology 15.Google Scholar
Sheets, Payson 1983. “Guatemalan Obsidian: A Preliminary Study of Sources and Quiri-gua Artifacts.” In Quirigua Reports, ed. Sharer, Robert. University Museum Monograph 49, University of Pennslyvania, Philadelphia.Google Scholar
Sheets, Payson 1984. “The Prehistory of El Salvador: An Interpretive Summary.” In The Archaeology of Lower Central America, ed. Lange, F. and Stone, D.. University of New Mexico Press, Albuquerque.Google Scholar
Sheets, Payson 1992. The Ceren Site. Harcourt Brace, Fort Worth, TX.
Sheets, Payson 1994. “Tropical Time Capsule.” Archaeology. July.Google Scholar
Sheets, Payson n.d. “The Pervasive Pejorative in Inter-mediate Area Studies.” Manuscript for Dumbarton Oaks publication, ed. Lange, Fred.
Sheets, Payson, (ed.). 1983. Archaeology and Volcanism in Central America: The Zapotitan Valley of El Salvador. University of Texas Press, Austin.
Stone, Doris. 1957. The Archaeology of Central and Southern Honduras. Papers, vol. 49, no. 3. Peabody Museum, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA.
Stone, Doris. 1972. Pre-Columbian Man Finds Central America. Peabody Museum Press, Cambridge, MA.
Turner, Frederick. 1932. The Significance of Sections in American History. Holt, New York.
Wallerstein, Immanuel. 1976. The Modeτn World System. Academic Press, New York.
Weeks, John, Black, Nancy, and Speaker, Stuart. 1987From Prehistory to History in Western Honduras: the Care Lenca in the Colonial Province of Tencoa.” In Interaction on the Southeast Mesoamerican Frontier, ed. Robinson, Eugenia. BAR International Series 327.Google Scholar
Willey, Gordon R. 1966. An Introduction to American Archaeobgy, Volume 1: North and Middle America. Prentice-Hall, Englewood Cliffs, NJ.
Willey, Gordon R. 1971. An Introduction to American Archaeology, Volume 2: South America. Prentice-Hall, Englewood Cliffs, NJ.
3
Cited by

Save book to Kindle

To save this book to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Available formats
×

Save book to Dropbox

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Available formats
×

Save book to Google Drive

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Available formats
×