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8 - Notation I

from Volume I

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  04 August 2018

Mark Everist
Affiliation:
University of Southampton
Thomas Forrest Kelly
Affiliation:
Harvard University, Massachusetts
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Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2018

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