Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-5959bf8d4d-57lbh Total loading time: 1.899 Render date: 2022-12-07T22:59:14.039Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "useRatesEcommerce": false } hasContentIssue true

11 - Music Theory

from Volume I

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  04 August 2018

Mark Everist
Affiliation:
University of Southampton
Thomas Forrest Kelly
Affiliation:
Harvard University, Massachusetts
Get access

Summary

Image of the first page of this content. For PDF version, please use the ‘Save PDF’ preceeding this image.'
Type
Chapter
Information
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2018

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

References

Primary Sources

Fischer, Pieter. The Theory of Music from the Carolingian Era up to 1400, ii: Italy. B/iii/2. Munich-Duisberg: G. Henle, 1968.Google Scholar
Huglo, Michel and Meyer, Christian. The Theory of Music: Manuscripts from the Carolingian Era up to c. 1500 in the Federal Republic of Germany (D-brd). B/iii/3. Munich: G. Henle, 1986.Google Scholar
Huglo, Michel and Phillips, Nancy C.. The Theory of Music: Manuscripts from the Carolingian Era up to c. 1500 in Great Britain and in the United States of America. B/iii/4. Munich: G. Henle, 1992.Google Scholar
Meyer, Christian et al. The Theory of Music from the Carolingian Era up to c. 1500 in the Czech Republic, Poland, Portugal and Spain. B/iii/5. Munich: G. Henle, 1997.Google Scholar
Meyer, Christian, et al. The Theory of Music from the Carolingian Era up to c. 1500: Addenda, Corrigenda. B/iii/6. Munich: G. Henle, 2003.Google Scholar
Shiloah, Amnon. The Theory of Music in Arabic Writings (c. 900–1900): Descriptive Catalogue of Manuscripts in Libraries of Egypt, Israel, Morocco, Russia, Tunisia, Uzbekistan, and Supplement to B x, RISM B/x A. Munich: G. Henle, 2003.Google Scholar
Shiloah, Amnon. The Theory of Music in Arabic Writings (c. 900–1900): Descriptive Catalogue of Manuscripts in Libraries of Europe and the U.S.A. B/x. Munich: G. Henle, 1979.Google Scholar
Smits van Waesberghe, Joseph. The Theory of Music from the Carolingian Era up to 1400, i: Descriptive Catalogue of Manuscripts. B/iii/1. Munich-Duisberg: G. Henle, 1961.Google Scholar

Secondary Sources

Arlt, Wulf, Lichtenhahn, Ernst, and Oesch, Hans, eds. Gattungen der Musik in Einzeldarstellungen: Gedenkschrift Leo Schrade. Bern: Franke Verlag, 1973.Google Scholar
Atkinson, Charles. The Critical Nexus: Tone System, Mode, and Notation in Early Medieval Music. Oxford University Press, 2009.Google Scholar
Balensuela, C. Matthew. “Anonymous Theoretical Writings,” in NG2, vol. i: 693707.Google Scholar
Barbera, André, ed. Music Theory and Its Sources: Antiquity and the Middle Ages. Notre Dame, IN: University of Notre Dame Press, 1990.Google Scholar
Beckmann, Jan Peter and Kluxen, Wolfgang, eds. Sprache und Erkenntnis im Mittelalter. Miscellanea mediaevalia 13, 2 vols. Berlin: de Gruyter, 1981.Google Scholar
Bent, Margaret. “The Grammar of Early Music: Preconditions for Analysis,” in Tonal Structures in Early Music, ed. Judd, Cristle Collins. New York: Garland, 1998, 1559.Google Scholar
Bernhard, Michael. “Glosses on Boethius’ De institutione musica,” in Music Theory and Its Sources: Antiquity and the Middle Ages, ed. Barbera, André. Notre Dame, IN: University of Notre Dame Press, 1990, 136–49.Google Scholar
Bernhard, Michael. “Das musikalische Fachschrifttum im lateinischen Mittelalter,” in Rezeption des antiken Fachs im Mittelalter, ed. Zaminer, Frieder, Geschichte der Musiktheorie 3. Darmstadt: Wissenschaftliche Buchgesellschaft, 1990, 37103.Google Scholar
Bernhard, Michael. “Uberlieferung und Fortleben der antiken lateinischen Musiktheorie im Mittelalter,” in Rezeption des antiken Fachs im Mittelalter, ed. Zaminer, Frieder, Geschichte der Musiktheorie 3. Darmstadt: Wissenschaftliche Buchgesellschaft, 1990, 735.Google Scholar
Bernhard, Michael. Wortkonkordanz zu Anicius Manlius Severinus Boethius De Institutione Musica, Veröffentlichungen der Musikhistorischen Komission 4. Munich: Bayerische Akademie der Wissenschaften, 1979.Google Scholar
Bernhard, Michael. ed. Lexicon Musicum Latinum Medii Aevi. Fascicle 1: Inventory of Sources. Munich: Verlag der Bayerischen Akademie der Wissenschaften, 1992.Google Scholar
Bernhard, Michael and Bower, Calvin M., eds. Glossa maior in institutionem musicam Boethii, 3 vols. Munich: Verlag der Bayerischen Akademie der Wissenschaft, 1993–96.Google Scholar
Bernhard, Michael and Witkowska-Zaremba, Elzbieta. Traditio Iohannis Hollandrini, 2 vols. Munich: Verlag der Bayerischen Akademie der Wissenschaft, 2010.Google Scholar
Bielitz, Mathias. Musik und Grammatik: Studien zur mittelalterlichen Musiktheorie. Munich: Katzbichler, 1977.Google Scholar
Boethius, Anicius Manlius. Fundamentals of Music, trans. Bower, Calvin M.. Music Theory Translation Series, ed. Palisca, Claude. New Haven, CT: Yale University Press, 1989.Google Scholar
Bower, Calvin. “Boethius’ De institutione musica: A Handlist of Manuscripts,” Scriptorium 42 (1988), 205–54.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Bower, Calvin. “The Grammatical Model of Musical Understanding in the Middle Ages,” in Hermeneutics and Medieval Culture, ed. Gallacher, Patrick J. and Damico, Helen. Albany, NY: State University of New York Press, 1989, 133–45.Google Scholar
Bower, Calvin. “The Transmission of Ancient Music Theory into the Middle Ages,” in The Cambridge History of Western Music Theory, ed. Christensen, Thomas. New York: Cambridge University Press, 2002, 136–67.Google Scholar
Thomas, Christensen, ed. The Cambridge History of Western Music Theory. New York: Cambridge University Press, 2002.Google Scholar
Cohen, David. “The Imperfect Seeks Its Perfection: Harmonic Progression, Directed Motion, and Aristotelian Physics,” Music Theory Spectrum 23/2 (2001), 139–69.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Cohen, David. “Notes, Scales and Modes in the Earlier Middle Ages,” in The Cambridge History of Western Music Theory, ed. Christensen, Thomas. New York: Cambridge University Press, 2002, 307–63.Google Scholar
Diehr, Achim. “Speculum corporis”: Korperlichkeit in der Musiktheorie des Mittelalters. Kassel: Bärenreiter, 2000.Google Scholar
Dobszay, László, Papp, Ágnes, and Sebó, Ferenc, eds. Cantus Planus: Papers Read at the Fourth Meeting, Pécs, Hungary, 3–8 September 1990. Budapest: Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Institute for Musicology, 1992.Google Scholar
Duchez, Marie-Elisabeth. “Description grammaticale et description arithmétique des phénomènes musicaux: Le tournant du IXe siècle,” in Sprache und Erkenntnis im Mittelalter, ed. Beckmann, Jan Peter and Kluxen, Wolfgang, 2 vols., Miscellanea mediaevalia 13. Berlin: de Gruyter, 1981 , ii: 561–79.Google Scholar
Dyer, Joseph. “Chant Theory and Philosophy in the Late 13th Century,” in Cantus Planus: Papers Read at the Fourth Meeting, Pécs, Hungary, 3–8 September 1990. Budapest: Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Institute for Musicology, 1992, 99118.Google Scholar
Dyer, Joseph. “The Place of Musica in Medieval Classifications of Knowledge,” Journal of Musicology 24/1 (2007), 371.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Dyer, Joseph. “Speculative ‘Musica’ and the Medieval University of Paris,” Music & Letters 90/2 (2009), 177204.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Eggebrecht, Hans. “Die Mehrstimmigkeitslehre von ihren Anfanger bis zum 12. Jahrhundert,” in Die Mittelalterliche Lehre von der Mehrstimmigkeit, ed. Zaminer, Frieder, Geschichte der Musiktheorie, 5. Darmstadt: Wissenschaftliche Buchgesellschaft, 1984, 987.Google Scholar
Eggebrecht, Hans and Zaminer, Frieder. Ad Organum faciendum, Lehreschriften der Mehrstimmigkeit in nachguidonischer Zeit, Neue Studien zur Musikwisenschaft 3. Mainz: Schott, 1970.Google Scholar
Ertelt, Thomas and Zaminer, Frieder, eds. Die Lehre vom Einstimmigen Liturgischen Gesang, Geschichte der Musiktheorie 4. Darmstadt: Wissenschaftliche Buchgesellschaft, 2006.Google Scholar
Fassler, Margot. “The Office of the Cantor in Early Western Monastic Rules and Customaries: A Preliminary Investigation,” Early Music History 5 (1985), 2951.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Fuhrmann, Wolfgang. Herz und Stimme: Innerlichkeit, Affekt und Gesang im Mittelalter. Kassel: Bärenreiter, 2004.Google Scholar
Fuller, Sarah. “Organum-discantus-contrapunctus in the Middle Ages,” in The Cambridge History of Western Music Theory, ed. Christensen, Thomas. New York: Cambridge University Press, 2002, 477502.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Gallacher, Patrick J. and Damico, Helen, eds. Hermeneutics and Medieval Culture. Albany, NY: State University of New York Press, 1989.Google Scholar
Gushee, Lawrence A.Questions of Genre in Medieval Treatises on Music,” in Gattungen der Musik in Einzeldarstellungen: Gedenkschrift Leo Schrade, ed. Wulf Arlt et al. Bern: Franke Verlag, 1973, 365433.Google Scholar
Hass, Max. “Die Musiklehre im 13. Jahrhundert von Johannes de Garlandia bis Franco,” in Die Mittelalterliche Lehre von der Mehrstimmigkeit, ed. Zaminer, Frieder, Geschichte der Musiktheorie, 5. Darmstadt: Wissenschaftliche Buchgesellschaft, 1984, 89159.Google Scholar
Hentschel, Frank. Sinnlichkeit und Vernunft in der mittelalterlichen Musiktheorie: Strategien der Konsonanzwertung und der Gegenstand der musica sonora um 1300. Stuttgart: F. Steiner, 2000.Google Scholar
Hentschel, Frank, ed. “Die Unmöglichkeit der Teilung des Ganztones in zwei gleiche Teile und der Gegenstand der musica sonora um 1300,” in Musik – und die Geschichte der Philosophie und Naturwissenschaften im Mittelalter: Fragen zur Wechselwirkung von “musica” und “philosophia” im Mittelalter, ed. Hentschel, . Leiden: E. J. Brill, 1998, 3960.Google Scholar
Hentschel, Frank, ed. Musik – und die Geschichte der Philosophie und Naturwissenschaften im Mittelalter: Fragen zur Wechselwirkung von “musica” und “philosophia” im Mittelalter, Studien und Texte zur Geistesgeschichte des Mittelalters 62. Leiden: E. J. Brill, 1998.Google Scholar
Herlinger, Jan. 2002. “Medieval Canonics,” in The Cambridge History of Western Music Theory, ed. Christensen, Thomas. New York: Cambridge University Press, 2002, 168–92.Google Scholar
Holsinger, Bruce. Music, Body and Desire in Medieval Culture: Hildegard of Bingen to Chaucer. Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press, 2001.Google Scholar
Huglo, Michel. “Bibliographie des éditions et études relatives à la théorie musicale du Moyen Âge (1972–1987),” Acta Musicologica 60/3 (1988), 229–72.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Huglo, Michel. “The Study of Ancient Sources of Music Theory in the Medieval Universities,” in Music Theory and Its Sources: Antiquity and the Middle Ages, ed. Barbera, André. Notre Dame, IN: University of Notre Dame Press, 1990, 150–72.Google Scholar
Hunt, Frederick Vinton. Origins in Acoustics. New Haven, CT: Yale University Press, 1978.Google Scholar
Judd, Cristle Collins, ed. Tonal Structures in Early Music. New York: Garland, 1998.Google Scholar
James, McKinnon, ed. Music in Early Christian Literature. Cambridge University Press, 1987.Google Scholar
James, McKinnon, ed. “The Early Christian Period and the Latin Middle Ages,” in SR, vol. ii.Google Scholar
Meyer, Christian. Mensura monochordi: La division du monocorde, IXe–XVe siècles, Publications de la Société française de musicologie, Seconde série 15. Paris: Sociéte française de musicologie; Éditions Klincksieck, 1996.Google Scholar
Meyer, Christian. Les Traités de musique. Typologie des sources du moyen âge occidental 85. Turnhout: Brepols, 2001.Google Scholar
Page, Christopher. The Christian West and Its Singers: The First Thousand Years. New Haven, CT: Yale University Press, 2010.Google Scholar
Page, Christopher. The Owl and the Nightingale: Musical Life and Ideas in France, 1100–1300. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1989.Google Scholar
Panti, Cecilia. “Robert Grosseteste’s Theory of Sound,” in Musik – und die Geschichte der Philosophie und Naturwissenschaften im Mittelalter: Fragen zur Wechselwirkung von “musica” und “philosophia” im Mittelalter, ed. Hentschel, Frank, Studien und Texte zur Geistesgeschichte des Mittelalters 62. Leiden: E.J. Brill, 1998, 318.Google Scholar
Powers, Harold and Wiering, Franz. “Mode,” in NG2, vol. xvi: 775823.Google Scholar
Randall, Don. “Al-Fārābī and the Role of Arabic Music Theory in the Latin Middle Ages,” Journal of the American Musicological Association 29/2 (1974), 173–88.Google Scholar
Rietmuller, Albrecht. “Probleme der spekulativen Musiktheorie im Mittelalter,” in Rezeption des antiken Fachs im Mittelalter, ed. Zaminer, Frieder, Geschichte der Musiktheorie 3. Darmstadt: Wissenschaftliche Buchgesellschaft, 1990, 163201.Google Scholar
Schrade, Leo. “Music in the Philosophy of Boethius,” The Musical Quarterly 33/2 (1947), 188200.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Shiloah, Amnon. “Techniques of Scholarship in Medieval Arabic Musical Treatises,” in Music Theory and Its Sources: Antiquity and the Middle Ages, ed. Barbera, André. Notre Dame, IN: University of Notre Dame Press, 1990, 8599.Google Scholar
Smits van Waesberghe, Joseph. Musikerziehung: Lehre und Theorie der Musik im Mittelalter. Leipzig: VEB Deutscher Verlag für Musik, 1969.Google Scholar
Strunk, Oliver. Source Readings in Music History, rev. ed. by Treitler, Leo, 2 vols. New York: W. W. Norton, 1998.Google Scholar
Tanay, Dorit. Noting Music, Marking Culture: The Intellectual Context of Rhythmic Notation, 1250–1400. Holzgerlingen: Hänssler, 1999.Google Scholar
Williams, David Russell and Matthew Balensuela, C.. Music Theory from Boethius to Zarlino: A Bibliography and Guide. Hillsdale, NY: Pendragon Press, 2007.Google Scholar
Wright, Owen. “Arab Music i,” in NG2, vol. i: 797824.Google Scholar
Yudkin, Jeremy. “The Influence of Aristotle on French University Music Texts,” in Music Theory and Its Sources: Antiquity and the Middle Ages, ed. Barbera, André. Notre Dame, IN: University of Notre Dame Press, 1990, 173–89.Google Scholar
Zaminer, Frieder, ed. Die Mittelalterliche Lehre von der Mehrstimmigkeit, Geschichte der Musiktheorie 5. Darmstadt: Wissenschaftliche Buchgesellschaft, 1984.Google Scholar
Zaminer, Frieder, ed. Rezeption des antiken Fachs im Mittelalter, Geschichte der Musiktheorie 3. Darmstadt: Wissenschaftliche Buchgesellschaft, 1990.Google Scholar
Zumthor, Paul. Essai de poétique médiévale. Paris: Seuil, 1972.Google Scholar

Save book to Kindle

To save this book to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Available formats
×

Save book to Dropbox

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Available formats
×

Save book to Google Drive

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Available formats
×