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Bibliography of English secondary sources and translations

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  05 January 2016

Haruo Shirane
Affiliation:
Columbia University, New York
Tomi Suzuki
Affiliation:
Columbia University, New York
David Lurie
Affiliation:
Columbia University, New York
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Print publication year: 2015

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References

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Cranston, Edwin. Waka Anthology. Vol. 1, The Gem-Glistening Cup. Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press, 1993.Google Scholar
Duthie, Torquil. Man’yōshū and the Imperial Imagination in Early Japan. Leiden: E.J. Brill, 2014.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
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Farris, William Wayne. Sacred Texts and Buried Treasures: Issues in the Historical Archaeology of Ancient Japan. Honolulu: University of Hawai‘i Press, 1998.Google Scholar
Frydman, Joshua. “Uta Mokkan: A History of Early Japanese Poetry through Inscription.” Ph.D. diss., Yale University, 2014.
Inoue, Nobutaka, ed. Shinto: A Short History. London: Routledge Curzon, 2003.Google Scholar
Konishi, Jin’ichi. A History of Japanese Literature. Vol. 1, The Archaic and Ancient Ages. Ed. Miner, Earl, trans. Gatten, Aileen and Teele, Nicholas. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, 1984.Google Scholar
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Aston, W.G., trans. Nihongi: Chronicles of Japan from the Earliest Times to A.D. 697. Rutland, VT and Tokyo: Charles E. Tuttle, 1972. (Original 1896, 2 vols.)Google Scholar
Bender, Ross. “Performative Loci of the Imperial Edicts in Nara Japan, 749–70.” Oral Tradition 24, no. 1 (2009): 249–68.Google Scholar
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Borgen, Robert, and Ury, Marian. “Readable Japanese Mythology: Selections from Nihon shoki and Kojiki.” Journal of the Association of Teachers of Japanese 24, no. 1 (1990): 6197.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
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Heldt, Gustav. The Kojiki: An Account of Ancient Matters. New York: Columbia University Press, 2014.Google Scholar
Isomae, Jun’ichi, Japanese Mythology: Hermeneutics on Scripture. Oakville, CT: Equinox, 2009.Google Scholar
Nakamura, Kyoko Motomochi, trans. Miraculous Stories from the Japanese Buddhist Tradition: The Nihon Ryōiki of the Monk Kyōkai. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 1973.Google Scholar
Philippi, Donald. Kojiki. Tokyo: University of Tokyo Press, 1968.Google Scholar
Philippi, Donald. Norito: A Translation of the Ancient Japanese Ritual Prayers. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, 1990. (Reprint of 1959 edition published by Kokugakuin University.)Google Scholar
Sakamoto, Tarō. The Six National Histories of Japan. Trans. Brownlee, John S.. Vancouver: University of British Columbia Press, 1991. (Translation of Rikkokushi, Yoshikawa kōbunkan, 1970.)Google Scholar
Sansom, George B.The Imperial Edicts in the Shoku Nihongi.” Transactions of the Asiatic Society of Japan 2, no. 1 (1924): 540.Google Scholar
Tanabe, George, ed. Religions of Japan in Practice. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, 1999.Google Scholar
Watson, Burton. Record of Miraculous Events in Japan: The Nihon ryōiki. New York: Columbia University Press, 2013.Google Scholar
Duthie, Torquil. “Poetry and Kingship in Ancient Japan.” Ph.D. diss., Columbia University, 2005.
Morris, Mark. “Japanese Folksong and Song in Early Japan: An Introduction.” Ph.D. diss., Harvard University, 1976.
Aoki, Michiko Y. Records of Wind and Earth: A Translation of Fudoki with Introduction and Commentaries. Ann Arbor, MI: Association for Asian Studies, 1997.Google Scholar
Carlqvist, Anders. “The Land-Pulling Myth and Some Aspects of Historic Reality.” Japanese Journal of Religious Studies 37, no. 2 (2010): 185222.Google Scholar
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Inoue, Tatsuo. “The Hitachi Fudoki and the Fujiwara.” Trans. Aoki, Michiko. In Piggott, Joan, ed., Capital and Countryside in Japan, 300–1180. Ithaca, NY: Cornell University East Asia Program, 2006.Google Scholar
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Palmer, Edwina. Harima Fudoki: A Record of Ancient Japan Reinterpreted. Leiden: E.J. Brill, 2015.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
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Commons, Anne. Hitomaro: Poet as God. Leiden: E.J. Brill, 2009.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Doe, Paula. A Warbler’s Song in the Dusk: The Life and Work of Ōtomo Yakamochi (718–85). Berkeley: University of California Press, 1982.Google Scholar
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Horton, H. Mack. Traversing the Frontier: The Man’yōshū Account of a Japanese Mission to Silla in 736–737. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Asia Center, 2012.Google Scholar
Levy, Ian Hideo, trans. The Ten Thousand Leaves: A Translation of the Man’yōshū, Japan’s Premier Anthology of Classical Poetry. Vol. 1. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, 1981.Google Scholar
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McCullough, Helen Craig. Kokin Wakashū: The First Imperial Anthology of Japanese Poetry, with “Tosa Nikki” and “Shinsen Waka.” Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press, 1985.Google Scholar
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Miller, Roy Andrew. “The Lost Poetic Sequence of the Priest Manzei.” Monumenta Nipponica 36, no. 2 (1981): 133–72.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
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